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ryangavin777  
#1 Posted : 10 September 2017 14:33:30(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
ryangavin777

I'm currently studying for the NEBOSH Unit B (Hazardous Substances and Agents), unit B3/4 to be specfic. I understand probably 80% of the content at the minute but I am struggling with is how do I translate this into a real life situation.

Lets assume, for example, that a new task is being introduced into the workplace such as cutting wood. How would I know what level of protection is required? What LEV is suitable? What RPE is required?

I know this would be as a result of a risk assessment but how would I actually know the amount of contaminant in the workplace? Would this be contracted out in the real world or am I completely missing something?

I'd really appreciate a real life scenario with calculations, if that's possible? 

I would be looking for a scenario similar to the below, if that's possible.

1. Stone massonary is having their LEV serviced and RPE is required several days. How would I know or calculate what level of protection is required? I understand that EH40 provides workplace exposure limits, which is great, but how do I actually know what the exposure limit is in my workplace?

I hope this makes sense! Many thanks in advance.

Kate  
#2 Posted : 10 September 2017 18:40:00(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kate

It's possible to do air sampling to measure dust.  This typically requires the services of an occupational hygienist backed up by a test lab which analyses the samples.  Dust is collected on filters through which the air is pumped, the filters are weighed before and after and the volume of air passed through the pump is calculated to end up with the airborne concentration.  That's the only way to really find out what the dust levels are.  But in many cases it may be possible to refer to measurements that have been made elsewhere in similar activities and implement similar controls.

A Kurdziel  
#3 Posted : 11 September 2017 15:52:18(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

If you are introducing new task such as cutting wood you would first start by identifying anything that that looked like it might be a substance hazardous to health eg wood dust.

You would look up what information was available about wood dust. Wood dust does not come with an SDS but there is guidance from the HSE- such as http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/wis23.pdf and of course it is mentioned in EH40.

Having established that it is harmful you should try to control the level of exposer SFARP. Rather than going straight for RPE you should look at things like a local extraction system (which of course has to be properly set up and maintained etc)

Then you check to see how effective the system is by measuring the amount of dust as described by the previous contributor.  You also have to take an overall look at the dust issue. What about the workers overalls; can they end up carrying dust about with them or taking it home.  Do you need some sort of changing facility? You almost certainly need some sort of hygiene facility. I’d ban eating and drinking in that area as well.  What about lung function tests if you think that someone is developing asthma due to dust exposure? Health surveillance?

Swygart25604  
#4 Posted : 14 September 2017 15:53:04(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Swygart25604

Hi,

You'd have to consider what the particle size of the dust was (inhalable / respirable), in terms of what type of mask you'd need. The occupational hygenist would be able to deduce that for you (or if it was a substance, the SDS or TDS would assist). There are various types of mask available, and you'd then want to look at the APF (assigned protection factor) of each one to make a decision as to suitability (coupled with fitting comfort, compatibility with other PPE etc etc).

As you allude, there is a calculation that the hygienist would use in terms of working out exposure over time, but I can't remember what it is now! And yes, you would need it in the exam, sorry! It came up in my Unit B.

toe  
#5 Posted : 30 October 2017 00:43:25(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
toe

Google - HSE, th edust lamp. Some useful information that may help.

CT1974  
#6 Posted : 06 December 2017 12:41:48(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
CT1974

A high level cleaning regime may also be required as you might introduce a DSEAR risk.

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