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merkon  
#1 Posted : 30 January 2020 22:23:41(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
merkon

Currently HSE Coordinator in a top class manufacturer.
Involvement in manufacturing, distribution operations and even construction activities and projects.
Gained very useful experience in all these fields, operations and activities.
Should I accept an EHS Specialist role in another (smaller) manufacturer based in only one small site?
Or should I accept another HSE Coordinator role which is purely within construction (with lots of travel all over -nationally- but also lots of admin and compliance too)?

What’s the most reasonable next step in order to progress and grow?
Would really appreciate your thoughts.

Edited by user 30 January 2020 22:26:57(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

inspector Gadget  
#2 Posted : 31 January 2020 09:33:56(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
inspector Gadget

Go for whichever one that pays the most which is also closer to home, has the best company perks, good colleagues, a chilled out boss and does the better coffee...

...seriously do you expect a useful answer from this forum? are you really the sort of person who takes important career advice from strangers?

thanks 1 user thanked inspector Gadget for this useful post.
SNS on 01/02/2020(UTC)
merkon  
#3 Posted : 31 January 2020 09:58:49(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
merkon

Originally Posted by: inspector Gadget Go to Quoted Post

Go for whichever one that pays the most which is also closer to home, has the best company perks, good colleagues, a chilled out boss and does the better coffee...

...seriously do you expect a useful answer from this forum? are you really the sort of person who takes important career advice from strangers?


A lot of people are working in different industries in here and they might have had the same dilemma at some point, so I don't think it is of any harm to ask for opinions and thoughts.

inspector Gadget  
#4 Posted : 31 January 2020 10:06:38(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
inspector Gadget

Ok. But appreciate that when you're asking should i take job A or job B questions.... there are a lot of variables involved some of which i have listed.

If the ONLY thing that matters to you is advancement, fine but surprising opportunities can come from any job... if you are skilled and competent advancement will come no matter which job you are in.

 

Roundtuit  
#5 Posted : 31 January 2020 10:10:39(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Originally Posted by: inspector Gadget Go to Quoted Post
...seriously do you expect a useful answer from this forum? are you really the sort of person who takes important career advice from strangers?

We may be strange (who would seriously want to be involved with OHS?) but we are not strangers - the majority of this forum are associated with or employed in Health and Safety at work which makes us a peer group with the relevant knowledge, background and understanding that entails.

Not every decision is down to money there are many other factors and personal circumstances to consider.

For example I have taken a position with a lower headline salary (paid LESS) because:

1) It was closer to home so less time wasted commuting

2) At the time the family was young so I got to see more of my children growing up

3) It was closer to home so commuting costs reduced significantly

4) The reduction in commuting costs meant my disposable salary increased significantly

Travel whilst initially attractive can be wearing due to the hours in transit, overnight stays away from home and a lot of time spent in your own company. It can also impact upon your social and celebration events in extended family life.

I have turned down opportuntities because they involved relocation - that extra £5K on salary really does not go far against a mortgage and living costs in London.

Advancing years tend to shift your priorities so softer aspects - pension, life assurance become as important as the salary which does influence the size of organisation you chose to work for.

So as to your next step draw up a list with the relative positives and negatives from your personal perspective and circumstances for current manufacturing, possible manufacturing and construction. The list with least negatives and most positives would be the logical choice.

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
jwk on 31/01/2020(UTC), jwk on 31/01/2020(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#6 Posted : 31 January 2020 10:10:39(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Originally Posted by: inspector Gadget Go to Quoted Post
...seriously do you expect a useful answer from this forum? are you really the sort of person who takes important career advice from strangers?

We may be strange (who would seriously want to be involved with OHS?) but we are not strangers - the majority of this forum are associated with or employed in Health and Safety at work which makes us a peer group with the relevant knowledge, background and understanding that entails.

Not every decision is down to money there are many other factors and personal circumstances to consider.

For example I have taken a position with a lower headline salary (paid LESS) because:

1) It was closer to home so less time wasted commuting

2) At the time the family was young so I got to see more of my children growing up

3) It was closer to home so commuting costs reduced significantly

4) The reduction in commuting costs meant my disposable salary increased significantly

Travel whilst initially attractive can be wearing due to the hours in transit, overnight stays away from home and a lot of time spent in your own company. It can also impact upon your social and celebration events in extended family life.

I have turned down opportuntities because they involved relocation - that extra £5K on salary really does not go far against a mortgage and living costs in London.

Advancing years tend to shift your priorities so softer aspects - pension, life assurance become as important as the salary which does influence the size of organisation you chose to work for.

So as to your next step draw up a list with the relative positives and negatives from your personal perspective and circumstances for current manufacturing, possible manufacturing and construction. The list with least negatives and most positives would be the logical choice.

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
jwk on 31/01/2020(UTC), jwk on 31/01/2020(UTC)
peter gotch  
#7 Posted : 31 January 2020 11:42:37(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
peter gotch

Good advice from Roundtuit following IG's unnecessary wind up. Reported for another posting.

CptBeaky  
#8 Posted : 31 January 2020 12:37:11(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
CptBeaky

It is hard to give advice with such little to go on. It seems the construction would advance your skills better, and therefore maybe you career. However, it depends on whether that ius the sort of advancement you want from a personal point of view.

For example, I work for a small-ish manufacturing company. I do 25 hours per week. I make enough to live on, but no fancy holidays or swanky car. I left a 40 hour per week job, that paid more. I consider this progression, by the sound of it you wouldn't. I spend my evenings walking my dog, and spending time with my wife. I wake up every morning feeling good, and even on those days I don't  know I only have 5 hours and  Iam back home again. My job is something I enjoy doing, and I still learn new things everyday.

Why wait until retirement to spend time doing the things you want to do? Retirement is not guaranteed, today is. So based on my goals I would take/stay with the job that gave me the best lifestyle for the foreseeable future based on my own goals.

merkon  
#9 Posted : 31 January 2020 13:29:14(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
merkon

Many thanks for your replies.

The only reason asking is because I am currently a Coordinator, probably it would be better if my next role is not another Coordinator one but something that sounds a bit better / higher / more senior, e.g. Specialist. The role is in manufacturing, so hands on etc.

However, I am keen to develop new skills and be involved in construction too, hence why I am interested in the construction role. The actual job title though for this one is Coordinator once again. It also seems like there will be a lot of compliance / admin tasks as well, trackers, scorecards, documentation etc.

The above hopefully explains why I am a bit confused and not sure which role I should choose.

Pay is similar, benefits and package pretty much the same.

MrBrightside  
#10 Posted : 31 January 2020 14:03:49(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
MrBrightside

Do not get hung on what you are called, in the grand scheme of things is that really what is most important.

I have taken a sideways shift before in an aim to get experience in an area I had never worked in before. If you want to go along the Construction Health & Safety route and this role with give you more exposure and experience then go for it. 

Taking on another role with the same name does not mean your not adavancing your career. Your increasing your experience and knowledge which is all that matters on a CV.

merkon  
#11 Posted : 31 January 2020 14:45:10(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
merkon

Definitely!
But when it comes to another sector?

I mean, my whole experience until now has mostly been within manufacturing.
And I am in a good level to get a HSE Managers role in a manufacturing site.

If I accept the HSE Coordinator role in the construction sector, isn't it a step backwards?
Doesn't it feel like I am starting again from the beginning?
Would I still be able to go back in manufacturing at some point if I want to?

These are all the questions that I am currently struggling to answer....

RVThompson  
#12 Posted : 31 January 2020 14:59:10(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
RVThompson

I would say that broadening your horizons and overcoming the inherent challenges in another industry will serve you well if you decide to move back to manufacturing.

Plenty of transferable skills: people-management, problem solving, training, etc.

After all, you can't buy experience.

Roundtuit  
#13 Posted : 31 January 2020 15:23:30(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Don't fret over titles - even within construction co-ordinator means different things at different employers at one it is the main advisor to the business at another it is the administrator filing the paperwork.

Any position (and title) is what you are allowed to make it.

If you start as H&S Manager what scope is there for a larger (than inflation) pay rise when you prove how good you are? Moving up grade scales is what you are after.

Roundtuit  
#14 Posted : 31 January 2020 15:23:30(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Don't fret over titles - even within construction co-ordinator means different things at different employers at one it is the main advisor to the business at another it is the administrator filing the paperwork.

Any position (and title) is what you are allowed to make it.

If you start as H&S Manager what scope is there for a larger (than inflation) pay rise when you prove how good you are? Moving up grade scales is what you are after.

chris42  
#15 Posted : 31 January 2020 15:36:52(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris42

Employers will invariably ask you what your previous wage was to see if you are in the right league and sometimes offer just above that, so take care about getting too much of a pay cut, even if closer etc.

However, look at each jobs spec to see which will give you the best additional skills / experience for you to carry on to the role after that one. So, as well as wage you are gaining better experiences ie handling more sites, involved with more corporate decisions, Differing industry knowledge etc. Only you will know what each one may be able to offer to you personally.

Chris

RayRapp  
#16 Posted : 02 February 2020 19:00:22(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
RayRapp

I think it really depends on your long term aspirations. For example, you might want to develop into a fully fledged OSH practitioner and also gain chartered status at some point in the future. If so, a role which will achieve that end with aid of a helpful employer hopefully. Sometimes you have to take a step back in order to take a step forward. That said, a HSE co-ordinator is not a normally a well paid role with the commensurate kudos. So any advancement could be seen as a positive step. Good luck.

Roundtuit  
#17 Posted : 02 February 2020 21:07:34(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

The advertisment for a position typically reflects both what the employer is expecting from the position holder and the amount of salary they are willing to offer as translated by the advertisor.

It is only when you negotiate with the potential employer apects such as holidays, pensions, car (allowance), and job title become finalised. If your psyche is so reluctant to remain a co-ordinator propose an alternative - employers are guided by the professional advisors they engage.

Just be prepared that any recruitment consultant involved may have set their rates based upon a title so the recruiter may decide not to pay for what may be a higher value invoice- you may need to wait for the period of the consultants contract to end.

Roundtuit  
#18 Posted : 02 February 2020 21:07:34(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

The advertisment for a position typically reflects both what the employer is expecting from the position holder and the amount of salary they are willing to offer as translated by the advertisor.

It is only when you negotiate with the potential employer apects such as holidays, pensions, car (allowance), and job title become finalised. If your psyche is so reluctant to remain a co-ordinator propose an alternative - employers are guided by the professional advisors they engage.

Just be prepared that any recruitment consultant involved may have set their rates based upon a title so the recruiter may decide not to pay for what may be a higher value invoice- you may need to wait for the period of the consultants contract to end.

Darren Guy  
#19 Posted : 11 February 2020 06:32:36(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Darren Guy

I have always found that variety is important in your career. Some may argue that its better to become a specialist rather than a generalist, and that may be true. However, as some of us grow closer to the twilight of our career, the aim may be to become a consultant and work how you want, where you want etc. Again, whilst there will be a demand in some specialist industries, there are also a great deal of SME's that require general advice and support. I notice a couple of members made the point regarding accepting smaller roles but took the decison to embrace a good work life balance. Some also said about chasing the money, and I can tell you from personal experience having worked in the Middle East for many years that there is always a trade off. Sure the money is great but often rotations are 8 weeks on and 3 weeks off and that can be a strain equally for those at home and away. Whatever you choose will be right for you and as long as you still love the profession and the work, you'll be fine. 

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