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Rdot  
#1 Posted : 15 August 2018 14:52:00(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Rdot

Hi all,

I have been receiving CVs for a SHEQ advisor role and in the main the people applying are holding a nebosh general or construction cert.

Now I know qualifications aren't everything and experience also plays a key part.

I always thought that as a professional HS person holding NEBOSH diploma or equivalent qualification would be a minimum when applying for a professional SHEQ role.

I just wanted to know what the thoughts are on this and maybe this is the way the job market currently stands.

(Also i am not knocking anyone who holds SHEQ / HS role with a cert   - i just want to see what everyones thoughts are so i know how to progress with finding the right person)

Thanks

Kate  
#2 Posted : 15 August 2018 15:03:46(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kate

I see many job adverts that ask for NEBOSH cert.

chris42  
#3 Posted : 15 August 2018 15:06:27(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris42

Is what you are willing to pay narrowing the field ?

Roundtuit  
#4 Posted : 15 August 2018 15:10:49(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

There are many managers and directors who only hold the Certificate. You say you are advertising for an advisor -at that level working towards the certificate should be sufficient, holding the certificate will save training expense.
A Kurdziel  
#5 Posted : 15 August 2018 15:15:12(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

It all depends on the sort of H&S role you are advertising and how it is perceived by people reading the job advert. Most people in H&S start off in a particular sector eg construction or manufacturing and gain experience in that before moving over to H&S. They then get the Nat. Cert. and start looking at entry level type H&S jobs.

They then take the leap of committing to the Diploma or its equivalent and then they become interested in H&S manager type jobs, with more responsibility and autonomy. Also more pay.

Read you job advert and see how it comes across; entry level or a more senior position?

O'Donnell54548  
#6 Posted : 16 August 2018 07:41:31(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
O'Donnell54548

NEBOSH is only one route to professional recognition in the H&S field, there are many others. Most Employers when advertising for a role in H&S have no idea what NEBOSH or CMIOSH actually means.

thanks 1 user thanked O'Donnell54548 for this useful post.
Gasman on 10/01/2020(UTC)
UncleFester  
#7 Posted : 16 August 2018 08:03:34(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
UncleFester

Originally Posted by: Rdot Go to Quoted Post

Hi all,

I have been receiving CVs for a SHEQ advisor role and in the main the people applying are holding a nebosh general or construction cert.

Now I know qualifications aren't everything and experience also plays a key part.

I always thought that as a professional HS person holding NEBOSH diploma or equivalent qualification would be a minimum when applying for a professional SHEQ role.

I just wanted to know what the thoughts are on this and maybe this is the way the job market currently stands.

(Also i am not knocking anyone who holds SHEQ / HS role with a cert   - i just want to see what everyones thoughts are so i know how to progress with finding the right person)

Thanks

If you've been receiving CVs, what did your advert briefly require? Was it just based on duties and functions or did you ask for any specific qualifications and experience? If you're after a specific set of skills and experience then you'll need to word your advert accordingly.

WatsonD  
#8 Posted : 16 August 2018 11:15:44(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
WatsonD

If you want only those with a diploma, then your advert should stipulate this is what you are looking for. However, those with a diploma will have higher salary expectations along with a more substantial role within the organisation too. If its a smaller role and in a smaller organisation along with a modest salary those with certificate level qualifications will be encouraged to apply. And if so then why not consider them? I am a SEHQ Manager with only a general cert.

bxuxa  
#9 Posted : 16 August 2018 20:34:28(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
bxuxa

Is not empiric that Diploma means an excellent professional, is only an academic level.

If looking for an Advisor, a bigger importance should be given to the capacity of resilience.

Rdot, are you aware of the differences between advisor, officer, manager, co-ordinator?

pseudonym  
#10 Posted : 17 August 2018 07:02:16(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
pseudonym

I'd really appreciate some ingformation the differences between 'officer' , 'advisor', 'coordinator' and 'manager' as none of the recruiters or employyers I've dealt with seem to know if there is a difference between them

The H&S profession hasn't done itself any favours over the years - IOSH Managing Safely / NEBOSH General Certificate etc confusion, for example - some other professions are much more focussed on what constitutes suitable knowledge and / or experience to carry out roles.

thanks 1 user thanked pseudonym for this useful post.
Elfin Davy 09 on 17/08/2018(UTC)
Ian Bell2  
#11 Posted : 17 August 2018 07:43:59(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ian Bell2

The difference between HSE Officer and HSE Manager is about £10-15k on your salary.

thanks 2 users thanked Ian Bell2 for this useful post.
A Kurdziel on 17/08/2018(UTC), charlottewdhd on 18/09/2018(UTC)
Elfin Davy 09  
#12 Posted : 17 August 2018 08:42:09(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Elfin Davy 09

pseudonym

You make a good point about professional "structure", but in truth, are we really a "profession" in the strictest sense ?  How many companies actually treat their Health and Safety team in the same way as their Legal Services team, their Accountants or their Occ Health providers (they being bona fide medical professionals) ?  In my personal experience, not a lot.  Too many organisations only employ someone in H&S either to blame when something goes wrong, or because they (wrongly) assume that doing so absolves those at the top of responsibility.  Of course there are exceptions, but arguably they are few and far between unfortunately.  Health and Safety still has an image problem, and I'm not sure enough is being done to rid ourselves of the "fun police" tag.   Sadly, I think we're still a long way away from being recognised as a "proper" profession...

 

A Kurdziel  
#13 Posted : 17 August 2018 10:47:57(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

In most professions there is a clear grading between different job descriptions. For example the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives has a clear grading structure associated with specific requirements for each level of job.   This clears up the arguments about, Health and Safety Adviser, Health and Safety Officer, Health and Safety Manager and Health and Safety Director.

Currently we are not that structured and H&S professionals often find themselves doing things outside the pure H&S remit such as environmental and security related matters.

What qualifications and experience you require for a job is entirely up to the person doing the recruitment and as said many don’t really understand the H&S role.

Mark-W  
#14 Posted : 20 August 2018 08:06:07(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

Originally Posted by: bxuxa Go to Quoted Post

Is not empiric that Diploma means an excellent professional, is only an academic level.

If looking for an Advisor, a bigger importance should be given to the capacity of resilience.

Rdot, are you aware of the differences between advisor, officer, manager, co-ordinator?

I work for a charity dealing with homeless people, we have approx 40 properties from supported housing, night shelters, bike workshops and office spaces. Spread from Basingstoke in the East to Exeter in the South.

My title is Co-ordinator, which I feel is wrong and my position has been given this title as a cost cutting measure.

I am the sole person in the H&S team. And answer directly to the Chief Exec

pseudonym  
#15 Posted : 20 August 2018 08:22:58(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
pseudonym

Interesting views - I wonder how many employers actually understand what goes into the various levels of H&S qualification? Please, please don't think I'm knocking any particular qualification or anyone's suitablity to hold down any particular role, but I do sometimes wonder why an employer accept the two week's NEBOSH General Cert for their H&S Manager, when they then ask for qualifications that take considerably longer to obtain for some other 'management' level posts.

For the record, I also think that there has been a tendancy over the years to inflate the qualifications required for almost all jobs these days - but that's probably another post?

Mark-W  
#16 Posted : 20 August 2018 08:51:05(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

I agree about qualifications and position. When I started 3 yrs ago my handover notes were very brief. Gave a list of my job and the reports I have to produce and when. The final parting statement at the end was

If you don't know the answer then Google it.

Turned out she had no H&S quals and conducted H&S from her desk and visited each property once ayear. Where as I'm never in the office, always out on the road visiting the teams and sorting their issues out at the coal face. I think I now have a good relationship with coalface workers and they are happy to ask for help.

I only have the Gen Cert, toying with the NVQ Lvl 5 route but unsure currently

pl53  
#17 Posted : 20 August 2018 13:06:40(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
pl53

I have to laugh when I see comments like "do you know the difference between HSE Officer and HSE Manager" etc. etc. 

There is no difference, you are what your employer wants to call you and you are paid what your employer wants to pay you. I have worked in many industries over that past 30 years and have had many job titles, but the core work has always been the same. 

We call ourselves professionals but very few others recognise that. We have no recognised professional structure, no national pay scales to guide employers so they will always take the view that you get what you pay for.

thanks 1 user thanked pl53 for this useful post.
aud on 24/01/2019(UTC)
pseudonym  
#18 Posted : 20 August 2018 14:27:56(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
pseudonym

"IOSH is the Chartered body for health and safety professionals

As the world's biggest professional health and safety membership organisation, we're the voice of the profession, campaigning on issues that affect millions of working people.

We set standards and support, develop and connect our members with resources, guidance, events and training.

I guess  we've got to take the above with a very large pinch of salt then?

Ian Bell2  
#19 Posted : 20 August 2018 15:20:20(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ian Bell2

The 'problem' with safety is that there are many people who make safety decisions that require no knowledge of IOSH, safety career structures etc, have no need for IOSH membership and qualifications. Indeed have no interest in such issues.

Take my industry - oil/petro-chemical.

There are thousands of highly qualified engineers of many disciplines - piping, chemical, electrical, instrumentation etc who daily make safety decisions that affect anybody who might work on, be adjacent to chemical plant e.g. the way plant operates to achieve safety, inherent safety, mechanical stress calculations to prevent process vessel failures etc

Safety people are just seen as those who walk around getting people to wear hard hats, fill out PtWs, carry out induction training etc. They only have limited input to the bigger safety decisions.

There is so much more to safety than having an IOSH/NEBOSH exam pass and ticket.

Such organisations need more out of safety than a NEBOSH guy coming along and saying you have to comply with xyz - typically CDM etc. That is a given, the harder bit is judging if what is proposed is acceptable. Hence engineering qualifications are more important that IOSH/NEBOSH tickets in my area.

I think this is why, to a large extent, it will remain very difficult for IOSH to ever define a career structure & qualifications required etc and hence pay grade/bands etc.

thanks 5 users thanked Ian Bell2 for this useful post.
Andrew W Walker on 20/08/2018(UTC), pseudonym on 21/08/2018(UTC), aud on 24/01/2019(UTC), Dave5705 on 14/02/2019(UTC), mihai_qa on 29/12/2019(UTC)
bxuxa  
#20 Posted : 20 August 2018 20:37:33(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
bxuxa

Returning to the job titles, yes there is a "theoretic" difference.

As examples, an HS Officer in the true sense should have the power to enforce, when the advisor, just advice according to ACOPs etc.

Well, for the title Safety Director I am get confused once, they called Director but is not on appointed as such on the company house.

toe  
#21 Posted : 20 August 2018 22:23:40(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
toe

Originally Posted by: bxuxa Go to Quoted Post

Returning to the job titles, yes there is a "theoretic" difference.

As examples, an HS Officer in the true sense should have the power to enforce, when the advisor, just advice according to ACOPs etc.

Well, for the title Safety Director I am get confused once, they called Director but is not on appointed as such on the company house.

What is the ACOPS you refer to?

I am a H&S Advisor responsable for over 3,000 employees operating accross Scotland, in my organisation I have the power to enforce, but in the main I like to advise.

Point to note: there are Executive Directors and Non-Executive Directors.

toe  
#22 Posted : 20 August 2018 22:29:35(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
toe

Rdot – On a different slant. As a person who delivers NEBOSH training courses, you would be surprised at the number of people who pass the course and think they are now safety professionals and can jump into a safety Managers/Officers etc. Job.

thanks 2 users thanked toe for this useful post.
pseudonym on 21/08/2018(UTC), nic168 on 28/08/2018(UTC)
bxuxa  
#23 Posted : 21 August 2018 02:50:19(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
bxuxa

Originally Posted by: toe Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: bxuxa Go to Quoted Post
Returning to the job titles, yes there is a "theoretic" difference.As examples, an HS Officer in the true sense should have the power to enforce, when the advisor, just advice according to ACOPs etc.Well, for the title Safety Director I am get confused once, they called Director but is not on appointed as such on the company house.
What is the ACOPS you refer to? I am a H&S Advisor responsable for over 3,000 employees operating accross Scotland, in my organisation I have the power to enforce, but in the main I like to advise. Point to note: there are Executive Directors and Non-Executive Directors.
You are correct. What is the propose of having a non-executive director for hs? Will not be the same as an advisor?
ScottRoberts1995  
#24 Posted : 21 August 2018 11:23:46(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
ScottRoberts1995

Originally Posted by: Rdot Go to Quoted Post

Hi all,

I have been receiving CVs for a SHEQ advisor role and in the main the people applying are holding a nebosh general or construction cert.

Now I know qualifications aren't everything and experience also plays a key part.

I always thought that as a professional HS person holding NEBOSH diploma or equivalent qualification would be a minimum when applying for a professional SHEQ role.

I just wanted to know what the thoughts are on this and maybe this is the way the job market currently stands.

(Also i am not knocking anyone who holds SHEQ / HS role with a cert   - i just want to see what everyones thoughts are so i know how to progress with finding the right person)

Thanks

What idustry are you recruiting in? and what pay was advertised/or not advertised?

Did you state a qualification level?

An experience level?

If no then how would you ever expect someone to know. You see a lot of job descriptions with "membership to IOSH is desirable" , which is an acceptable statement but could be improved if recruiters looked into what membership level would best suit their clients needs. 

There are advisor roles out there which are stated as "entry level" and then you see advisor roles which are clearly more senior roles. Titles within H&S are extremely confusing, there are numerous titles you can have but there is no given structure e.g. assistance -  junior advisor - advisor - officer etc.

Zyggy  
#25 Posted : 22 August 2018 18:03:29(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Zyggy

From experience, the recruitment of any H&S post largely depends on who within the organisation writes the Person Specification & Job Description. If this is an existing H&S professional, then you have a better chance of getting the right fit for that particular position, using a combination of qualifications & experience. However, if this is left to HR, then this is where the problems start! Most HR recruitment sections have no idea what they really need & this is why you still see adverts that state " must be NEBOSH qualified" or even " members of NEBOSH"!! They usually then use junior staff to filter the applications & stick strictly to a tick box mentality, i.e. one person I know was rejected as he did not have a NEBOSH Cert....whilst his degree in OH&S was ignored! Perhaps it's time that IOSH had discussions with the CIPD to educate their members? I fully agree with Ian about H&S qualifications not being the most important element in many industries. I used to work in the gas industry & took every opportunity to receive training in many engineering aspects,, however, I did find that my IOSH qualifications did dovetail with these areas of knowledge.
jodieclark1510  
#26 Posted : 24 August 2018 13:53:48(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
jodieclark1510

Originally Posted by: Rdot Go to Quoted Post

What do you consider a professional SHEQ role to be? 

pip306  
#27 Posted : 07 September 2018 14:18:32(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
pip306

Having just spoken to a company about a field based role they are advertising i do agree alot don't understand what they are asking for only that they have to have a safety person. The role would have attracted someone with a qualification btu no expereience but not someone with experience to fulfil the job description. I am also finding salaries are decreasing as well. A UK field based role with no car allowance or car???? really

michaelc  
#28 Posted : 08 September 2018 00:09:33(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
michaelc

I found it amazing reading these post as a CMIOSH member currently offshore in a high risk area I have applied for many jobs on-shore to be told I was not suitable due to my background.

I find this strange given I am highly qualified and sit on the offshore IOSH group as a committee member and there are managers onshore  with nebosh general or less .

I dont know if its the fact the person interviewing is less qualified and is wary of me.

thanks 1 user thanked michaelc for this useful post.
jim4244 on 19/01/2019(UTC)
bxuxa  
#29 Posted : 09 September 2018 16:02:22(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
bxuxa

michaelc

Qualifications are just one of the thing that the recruiters will be looking for.

Possibly, you are looking for jobs opportunities with the same pay rate. Onshore the best-paid positions are more "political", occupied by persons that barely go to the site.

How well will you accept a NO?

In a high risk area, no one will question the rules but for most of us is different.

jim4244  
#30 Posted : 19 January 2019 09:44:50(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
jim4244

Hmmm.... Well, to be honest, I am sick and tired coming across so called HSE professionals in supervisory and management roles who have no formal or recognised qualifications and are not members of a recognised professional body.

It makes me wonder why I wasted tens of thosands of pounds and sleepless nights studying over the last 19 years to become a CMIOSH whilst working full time in various H&S roles across the globe.

It would appear that anyone can simly "have a go" at Health & Safety regardless of their background, education, experience or qualification.....

Edited by user 19 January 2019 10:08:50(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

jim4244  
#31 Posted : 19 January 2019 09:55:13(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
jim4244

To make matters worse most recruiters don;'t really understand (or care?) about HS&E qualifications / certifications.

A couple of weeks ago I was contacted by a woman from a well known specialist H&S recruitment company. She explained that she had found my CV on a job board and thought that I would be an excellent candidate for a H&S Management role she was looking to fill.

She started by asking me if I had an IOSH Managing Safely. I pointed out that while indeed I did have a Manageing Safety I also had 3 NEBOSH Certs, a NVQ 4 and a Diploma in H&S. Her relpy was "Oh OK.... but you do definately have an IOSH Managing Safely?"

After reconfirming that I did she then asked if I was a Tech IOSH. I pointed out that I was a CMIOSH. Her reply was "Oh.... My client really wants someone who has achieved Tech IOSH standard.

After this reply I suggested that we end the call, which appeared to make her quite annoyed, with her suggesting that if I was not looking for a job then I should remove my CV from the various online job boards.

So, what type of organisation in the UK would be looking to recruit a HSE Manager with a IOSH Managing Safely as their highest formal H&S certification?

thanks 4 users thanked jim4244 for this useful post.
A Kurdziel on 23/01/2019(UTC), Dave5705 on 14/02/2019(UTC), RVThompson on 28/11/2019(UTC), mihai_qa on 29/12/2019(UTC)
AcornsConsult  
#32 Posted : 19 January 2019 19:39:27(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
AcornsConsult

Its a long thread and the recurring theme is that qualfications nor memberships are a defining part of many H&S roles.  Significant sized companies can have quite rudamentary needs whilst a small specialist provider may be hugely technical needs in theirs. And for that reason I can easily se how a manager may be "over" qualified for one and yet under qualified for the other.  Simialarly, many threads here talk about using the people doing the job to be involved in the H&S process - there can cme a stage when that is equally if not more important in defining a good person to fila role than a qualification  or membership. In recruiting terms, the recruiter may be the problem rather than the potential employer.  Asa potnetial employee isn't the most important part bit being where the person is capable, competent and has the right overall package to satisfy the known and expected job role - at times that may be pushing the bounds of a CMIOSH and over the top with having had a familiarisation course (Exaggerated example).  

Edited by user 19 January 2019 19:41:42(UTC)  | Reason: ontext

hilary  
#33 Posted : 21 January 2019 11:32:20(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
hilary

I think that if you want a particular level of qualification then you should ask for that.  If you don't, it's like going into the greengrocers hoping to buy apples and asking for green fuit - don't be surprised if you walk out with cucumbers, pears, green peppers and grapes.  Be specific, ask for what you want and then see who applies.  H&S people can be perceptive but they are not, generally, mind readers who will automatically know what you are looking for.

wilco612  
#34 Posted : 23 January 2019 09:36:14(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
wilco612

Having looked at numerous jobs over recent weeks that are appearing on the job websites, then the majority are only asking for the Nebosh Certificate.  I can only assume that the lack of candidates with the diploma is down to the fact that the cost of the course has made it prohibitive.  When you are potentially looking at £9k for the course, I can see why that would be a problem.

I am lucky in that I did the NTU ProDipSHEM course just before the price doubled to £9k and the course was scrapped.

Still what companies are asking for warrants a whole team never mind one person.

Hopefully you managed to find the right candidate.

pseudonym  
#35 Posted : 23 January 2019 10:42:47(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
pseudonym

looks like I might be back in the hunt for 'proper job' again after some months in temp / agency role. 

Still amazed at all the roles that only ask for IOSH Managing Safely / NEBOSH Certificate .. ..

My current role has been advetised externally and I was told I could apply as well (there's nice!), but at one level good luck to whoever gets it, because I think you'll need it - poor management culture, under-resourced role and so on.

Ho hum. Anyone got a good job going spare?

mike52  
#36 Posted : 23 January 2019 10:49:15(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
mike52

Originally Posted by: jim4244 Go to Quoted Post
Hmmm.... Well, to be honest, I am sick and tired coming across so called HSE professionals in supervisory and management roles who have no formal or recognised qualifications and are not members of a recognised professional body. It makes me wonder why I wasted tens of thosands of pounds and sleepless nights studying over the last 19 years to become a CMIOSH whilst working full time in various H&S roles across the globe. It would appear that anyone can simly "have a go" at Health & Safety regardless of their background, education, experience or qualification.....
wilco612  
#37 Posted : 23 January 2019 10:54:33(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
wilco612

Sounds like the temporary job I went for.  Was advertised as a 3 month contract before it would be made permanent, but would be advertised externally with no guarantee you would get the job.  Thought best option would be to wait until the 3 months were up and then apply.

Mr.Flibble2.0  
#38 Posted : 23 January 2019 11:21:28(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Mr.Flibble2.0

I have been doing safety for 20 years and I only have the General and Construction Certs, I'm not a member of IOSH and currently in the role of Regional SHE Manager.

At a recent job interview for a more senior role I mentioned that I was undertaking the Level 6 Diploma and got asked 'why, you haven't needed it so far and will it make you a better Safety Manager'.

My honest answer was no it won't make me a better Safety Manager, but I need it on my CV when I apply for Senior Roles.

I can’t quote Legislation chapter and verse, but then I don’t need to. I know the intent of Legislation and how that translates to the workplace and if I don’t I know where to get that information from.

Qualifications in our industry are not the be all to end all and they give you a fantastic understanding of the subject if you are new or want to know more, and sometimes specific qualifications and advanced knowledge are required for more hazardous working environments. Hats off to everyone who has.

We get far to hung up on what qualifications we all have or what someone should have to do our roles. Having a qualification is a portion of what makes a Safety Manager (or whatever we are called) and there is still a bit of snobbery that goes on around who has what (so many threads arguing between what’s better NEBOSH or NCRQ). I have worked with Managers who have a higher qualification than me, who did not have a clue and I am sure I’m not the only one.

It doesn’t matter what qualifications you or anyone else has as long as your goal is to keep everyone safe and the company legally compliant, which if you do one right the other will fall into place.

thanks 1 user thanked Mr.Flibble2.0 for this useful post.
Dave5705 on 23/01/2019(UTC)
jwk  
#39 Posted : 23 January 2019 11:22:10(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
jwk

Hmm, yes very interesting thread. Sector experience is certainly important, as much as anything because of the different soft skills that are needed in different industries. What I find interesting is that the team I have inherited are mostly MCIEH (one has allowed her membership to lapse) rather than CMIOSH (or any other IOSH for that matter). I had never considered that as an appropriate route, but given the dreadful morale in many LAs at the moment I suspect there must be quite a few EHOs looking to break out,

John

Edited by user 23 January 2019 11:23:43(UTC)  | Reason: The usaul

thanks 2 users thanked jwk for this useful post.
A Kurdziel on 23/01/2019(UTC), aud on 24/01/2019(UTC)
A Kurdziel  
#40 Posted : 23 January 2019 13:11:44(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

As jwk has said, sector based knowledge is very important: you need to know how the job works and equally importantly you need to know how the people in that sector function and what is the best way to get them onside. Qualifications like the Diploma (other possibly, better qualifications are available) are useful in that they give you an insight into the wider H&S picture. So for example when it comes to construction how many H&S construction specialists really understand chemical risks and do a proper COSHH risk assessment? Similarly a good general H&S qualification will give you a handle on things like human factors, accident causation which are things that you won’t necessarily pick up ‘on the job’.

Most importantly a good H&S qualification should clearly define the limits of your knowledge and tell you when you need to ask for more specialist help.

thanks 1 user thanked A Kurdziel for this useful post.
Dave5705 on 23/01/2019(UTC)
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