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James Liepa  
#1 Posted : 09 August 2017 10:54:29(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
James Liepa

I’m looking for advice on the grid system that supports suspended ceiling tiles in a office block (600mm x 600mm). I have been told that the current grid that holds our  tiles do not give one hour fire resistance as they are a 15mm grid and one hour fire resistance for suspended ceiling can only be given by the 24mm grid. I having difficulty trying to  findout whether this is true or not (advice welcome).

firesafety101  
#2 Posted : 09 August 2017 11:41:57(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
firesafety101

James, try this link, I just searched and it came up.

https://www.armstrongceilings.com/commercial/en-gb/technical-downloads/faqs-suspended-ceilings-fire-resistance.html#product3

The content includes this paragraph...3. Q:  What is the fire resistance of Armstrong ceiling tiles?

A: In relation to suspended ceilings, fire resistance can only be achieved by a combined tile and grid system; so there is no such thing as a fire resistant tile or a fire resistant grid.

Depending upon national market legislation, the type of structure to be protected i.e. wood, concrete or steel and our product offer, our Armstrong ceiling systems can typically provide 30, 60 or even more minutes protection. Full details of the ceiling type and construction, protected structure and tested time are given in each fire report, a copy of which, is available on request.

I am in no way connected with the company.

Alfasev  
#3 Posted : 09 August 2017 12:15:44(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Alfasev

It is not that simple as you have to look at the whole ceiling/floor construction, including any lighting, air conditioning, pipes etc. that may penetrate the ceiling. There are suspended fire rated ceilings systems but there are also systems that work in conjunction with the structure.

One way to be satisfied that there is 1 hr fire resistance is to look at the original documentation (product certification, as-builts etc.) in the Building Manual or from when it was installed. Alternatively try and identified the manufacture and approach them.

However Building Manuals are often lost, not updated, inadequate or never existed. The building owner/landlord/management agent should have the building manual and/or the fire design strategy documentations. Building Control are also likely to have some documentation and may offer access to their records.

You will also have to satisfy yourself that the ceilings are not damaged and maintained as the manufactures intended.   They should have been installed correctly but poor installation is a known issue.

How old is the building? 

James Liepa  
#4 Posted : 09 August 2017 13:25:58(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
James Liepa

Originally Posted by: Alfasev Go to Quoted Post

It is not that simple as you have to look at the whole ceiling/floor construction, including any lighting, air conditioning, pipes etc. that may penetrate the ceiling. There are suspended fire rated ceilings systems but there are also systems that work in conjunction with the structure.

In this case we can only find the architects design for one floor from 1999 stating 1 hour fire resistance between floors (nothing for the other 2 floors), local building control have never visited the site and said because it was converted over 15 years ago they are unlikely to come back and look ( I found that response worrying)

Ron Hunter  
#5 Posted : 10 August 2017 13:13:05(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ron Hunter

I'd concentrate on the ceiling to which the suspended grid is attached, and the integrity of all compartment breakthroughs hidden up there. I take that ultimately it is the resistance of the compartment which concerns you.

That grid could be penetrated by ordinary and emergency lighting, sprinkler heads, ventilation ducts, suspended sign fixings, etc. I think it would be 'unusual' to consider the suspended ceiling as the ultimate compartment barrier?

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