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davidjohn#1  
#1 Posted : 12 April 2018 20:55:31(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
davidjohn#1

Hi,

I'm after some advice regarding stoarge of finsihed products (fragrances) in their propiety packaging. Our storage of such products are on the sales floor in a shop and back of house. The questions is around how these should be stored and calculating maximum quanties.

Looking at HSG51 - Section 223: storage of flammable liquids gudiance it states that it ispermissible for a single containers of less than 0.5l nominal capacity to be kept in general storage facility with other materials if precautions are taken e.g. product is sealed/unopened, adequate ventilation etc. 

1st Q - no mention of the need for flammbale storage cabinets as long as room / partitions meet fire construction reqirements however, section 228 states that additional stock could be kept safe in a building, room or cabinet that meets design standards, which I assume is referring to fire construction and is in contrast to section 223. I'm taking it that such items be stored on shelving/plastic storage boxes/ storage cupboards etc as low risk, is this correct? 

I'm also interested to know how other retailers approach this,  as many shops have fragrances on display and stock back of house?

2nd and last Q - in the guidance it refers to maxim 50L per compartment e.g. cabinet room etc. When calculating the total amount stored, i believe this to be the overall container volume, not the alcohol volume, is this correct?

Apologies for the long post.

DJ

Stuart Smiles  
#2 Posted : 12 April 2018 21:17:12(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Stuart Smiles

look at the retail concessions under adr, - which means that in retail packaging it is viewed as not being dangerous goods, what do the outer boxes say on them - are they marked as limited quantities, exempted or flammable, with un number? 

have a look on dft web site for retail exemptions dangerous goods, 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/553825/dangerous-goods-guidance-note-7.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/3275/approved-derogations-transitional-provisions.pdf

thanks 1 user thanked Stuart Smiles for this useful post.
davidjohn#1 on 12/04/2018(UTC)
davidjohn#1  
#3 Posted : 12 April 2018 22:21:44(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
davidjohn#1

Originally Posted by: Stuart Smiles Go to Quoted Post

look at the retail concessions under adr, - which means that in retail packaging it is viewed as not being dangerous goods, what do the outer boxes say on them - are they marked as limited quantities, exempted or flammable, with un number? 

have a look on dft web site for retail exemptions dangerous goods, 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/553825/dangerous-goods-guidance-note-7.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/3275/approved-derogations-transitional-provisions.pdf

Thanks Stuart, I thought adr was to do transporting goods but I will explore further and look at the links you shared.


Stuart Smiles  
#4 Posted : 13 April 2018 11:18:06(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Stuart Smiles

ADR also covers packaging, but limited quantites in retail concessions sort of rules that out as being no longer relevant, because you have to be able to take what you buy home in the car. 

As such, with limited quantities and excepted quantities the product risks are not considered as the flammable risk do to being in small amounts, and the way in which it is packed. 

this could be your mechanism to store in the storeroom as required without a fire cabinet. you may however want to use a locked steel cabinet for other risks, such as high value employee theft, and knowing where it lives / labelled storage bin for products, or reduced storage at stores, and higher storage within a distribution environment and more frequent transfer to stores when sold. 

which also would have the effect of reducing flammable liquids stored at the shop, when space in back rooms would be limited at best. 

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/priced/hsg71.pdf

Edited by user 13 April 2018 11:37:33(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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