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Mark-W  
#1 Posted : 13 May 2019 09:59:58(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

1 of my clients has invested a huge sum of money in a tyre baling machine, I didn't relaise the cost of them but they managed to blag a £300K investment from the EU and that didn't cover a small proportion of the project.

Anyway, we now have the baler installed and producing bales, they aren't to PAS 108 standard, so not used for construction or other projects. Currently were shipping them to India.

I've trawled the WWW and can find no regulations on high the bales can be stacked. There are several sites which explain about how to stack them, ie like a brick wall so bales all interlock but nothing about height.

I'm trying to get client to agree to 3 bales high but they want to go upto 5 bales high. 

Can anyone shed any light on where to find the regs.

When I google tyre baling firms all the company websites show bales stacked without interlocking and some well over 5 bales high. But none will respond to my emails asking about the regs for this.

Roundtuit  
#2 Posted : 13 May 2019 10:17:29(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Safe stacking height will depend upon the bale formation (how cubic it is) the dimensions (larger stable bales being able to be stacked higher) stack construction (intertlocked or straight), handling equipment and the ground (flat concrete pad versus hard standing).

Seems like a relativley new industry so I doubt there will be much documented guidance - I would reference materials such as paper (large cubic bales) and textile (smaller rounded bales) to draw a conclusion

In a previous life our paper stacks would be 7 bales high but the textiles only 3 - down to the mechanical handling available

thanks 1 user thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Mark-W on 13/05/2019(UTC)
Mark-W  
#3 Posted : 13 May 2019 10:22:53(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

Bales are the same size as those for PAS108 but because they are loaded by conveyor and dropped into the compressing chamber rather than hand loaded, as for PAS 108 bales. So they are in essecne the same in size and weight but not formed in the same way.

They are bound by the same number of wires ties which are formed by machine not hand. The bales are very sturdy.

I'm tempted to conduct some trials. Stack them in the corner of the yard at 3 and 5 bales high and see if they can be easily knocked over with the handling equipment. Obviously all done in a safe and controlled manner. 

DiMason  
#4 Posted : 13 May 2019 12:12:50(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
DiMason

Hi

This may not be what you are looking for, but the WISH forum has guidance on bales stacking etc, more to do with fire safety but you fins some useful info there. Try googling 'Reducing fire risk as waste management sites'

Good luck

thanks 1 user thanked DiMason for this useful post.
Mark-W on 13/05/2019(UTC)
A Kurdziel  
#5 Posted : 13 May 2019 12:37:13(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

Mark: as a frequent user of this forum you know that there are not always rules and guidance for every eventually. Sometime something is so new (or rare) that nobody has ever tried it before. This does not mean that you should not be doing it just making sure that you are doing it safely.  Rather than look for rules etc you could try to find an organisation (research institute, University or trade organisation etc) who might be interested in this activity as a new project. As you have spent a considerable amount of money on this it might be worth your while investing in small a project with them to see if you can come up with a validated method to do this safely.

thanks 1 user thanked A Kurdziel for this useful post.
Mark-W on 13/05/2019(UTC)
billyTPS  
#6 Posted : 14 May 2019 09:38:09(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
billyTPS

This may or may not help but hit my inbox this morning: https://press.hse.gov.uk...worker-crushed-to-death/

https://press.hse.gov.uk/2019/05/13/recycling-company-fined-after-worker-crushed-to-death/?utm_source=govdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=press-pw-130519&utm_content=recycling-crush-death 

Mark-W  
#7 Posted : 14 May 2019 09:40:54(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

Originally Posted by: billyTPS Go to Quoted Post

This may or may not help but hit my inbox this morning: https://press.hse.gov.uk...worker-crushed-to-death/

https://press.hse.gov.uk/2019/05/13/recycling-company-fined-after-worker-crushed-to-death/?utm_source=govdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=press-pw-130519&utm_content=recycling-crush-death 

Many thanks, saw that yesterday and printed it off and posted it on the canteen wall for all to read.  Hopefully it will sink in with the operators

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