Welcome Guest! The IOSH forums are a free resource to both members and non-members. Login or register to use them

Postings made by forum users are personal opinions. IOSH is not responsible for the content or accuracy of any of the information contained in forum postings. Please carefully consider any advice you receive.

Notification

Icon
Error

Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Brough900048  
#1 Posted : 06 September 2010 15:47:53(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Brough900048

Does anyone have any ideas from making manual handling training a bit more fun / lively? Any suggestions for practical demos or visual stuff or games? I am going to have to do some training at some stage and want to make it less dry, also a some of the employees have English as a second language. Thanks Steve.
Alex Petrie  
#2 Posted : 06 September 2010 21:20:24(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Alex Petrie

Hmm...practical manual handling demo.... If you're near a residential street you could discuss the manual handling / ergonomic problems overcome by burglars as they relieve homeowners of their possessions. I wouldn't recommend practising this in a neighbourhood watch area though. What do your audience do for a living? I'd find out as much as I can about that and incorporate it into a discussion on T-I-L-E. A
Roly  
#3 Posted : 07 September 2010 14:08:23(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Roly

I have a simple technique which I use to demonstrate the need to keep the load close to your body. It is fun and usually generates laughter. I have a 4lb cast iron weight of the type you used to see in shops which you put on balance scales (best place to find one is in an antique/bric-a-brac shop). it has a small loop of cord on it. I ask one of the class if they can lift it - no problem - only 4 lb. Then I slip the cord over the hook end of a walking stick, place it on the floor at walking stick distance, and then ask them to lift it while holding the stick at the end with one hand only. The result is that most people cannot lift it, or only raise it a few inches with lots of shaking. Sometimes a tough guy lifts it fairly easy. Sometimes I chide them by lifting it up with the walking stick vertical saying "its only 4lb" and pass it onto someone else It never fails to make the point about not lifting loads at a distance from the body, as many people try to do if reaching for something which has poor access. Good luck Roly
Ken Slack  
#4 Posted : 07 September 2010 14:16:09(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ken Slack

Roly, Hope you've done a Manual Handling Assessment for that activity!! LOL
Roly  
#5 Posted : 07 September 2010 14:25:55(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Roly

Ken Its what makes the course so long!
RayRapp  
#6 Posted : 07 September 2010 14:35:33(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
RayRapp

MHO fun? I've had more fun at the dentist...
Safety Smurf  
#7 Posted : 07 September 2010 14:41:43(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Safety Smurf

RayRapp wrote:
MHO fun? I've had more fun at the dentist...
I just got bored once I'd found all the hidden toothbrushes in the poster ;-)
Jane Blunt  
#8 Posted : 07 September 2010 14:49:03(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Jane Blunt

As someone qualified to teach this technique I present this as the task for the course http://www.storman.co.uk/judo/throws/kataguru.htm and ask for volunteers. It always causes a giggle, and I use it to discuss the weight guidelines, the importance of lifting close to the body and the importance of the head position. No one has volunteered yet, as I point out that the thrower is going to be OK, but I could get through a lot of volunteer fall guys.
abromhead  
#9 Posted : 07 September 2010 15:29:57(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
abromhead

Hi Steve A couple of ideas typically as group exercises to promote some banter and discussion: - Calculation exercise: how many manual handling operations are involved in getting 50 items from the supermarket shelves back to your shelves at home? A good one to spark some discussion and emphasise how much handling we do without realising - typical answer is in the order of 270-300 operations - Jam doughnuts: issued to everyone at the start - so the first challenge is not to eat it before you get to the anatomy section. Jam doughnuts are often compared to lumbar discs, so participants can test the flexibility, cause some of the fibres (cartilage) to tear and make the jam (nucleus) prolapse out. They can then eat their prolapsed disc in the break. A messy exercise, but a good talking point and one they will remember a few months down the line - before and after video clips of handlers in action - such as the HSE produced as part of its Better Backs campaign. Split participants into groups at the start of the session, give them a video clip to view and get feedback on what are the problems, what injuries might result and what could be done about it. If they jot down their results you can then return to the same clips at the end of your training session and get them to repeat the exercise - hopefully with better informed end results I find these useful on my handler training as well as when I am running the City & Guilds Manual Handling Train the Trainer courses, Hope this helps Alistair http://www.abromhead.co....ng-train-the-trainer.asp
ahoskins  
#10 Posted : 07 September 2010 15:41:29(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
ahoskins

Jane, My virus checker (Kaspersky) flagged up a virus in your link - could be a false positive but better check it out? Alan
teh_boy  
#11 Posted : 07 September 2010 16:13:02(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
teh_boy

ahoskins wrote:
Jane, My virus checker (Kaspersky) flagged up a virus in your link - could be a false positive but better check it out? Alan
Agree with virus warning! TRY http://judoinfo.com/kataguru.htm instead
saferay  
#12 Posted : 07 September 2010 17:54:08(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
saferay

Why not try a team lift using a desk (not too heavy mind!!!) and placing several marker pens laying down in different directions and ask trainees to move the desk without them rolling off. You could also try this with the marker pens standing on end. Usually gets a bit of a laugh from all concerned. Adrian
PhilBeale  
#13 Posted : 07 September 2010 18:03:55(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
PhilBeale

saferay wrote:
Why not try a team lift using a desk (not too heavy mind!!!) and placing several marker pens laying down in different directions and ask trainees to move the desk without them rolling off. You could also try this with the marker pens standing on end. Usually gets a bit of a laugh from all concerned. Adrian
Hi Adrian what does this exercise demonstrate other than when trying to lift something as a team all the pens end up on the floor. Surely you would want to encourage people to lift things in a team or seek assistance if required. Like the Jam doughnuts idea as you say probably something that sticks (lol) with people and makes it a bit more simpler to remember. Phil
saferay  
#14 Posted : 09 September 2010 17:00:16(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
saferay

Phil The excercise demonstrates the need for team lifts to be controlled and co-ordinated rather than going it at it like a bull at a gate. Adrian
Jeni D  
#15 Posted : 09 September 2010 17:24:58(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Jeni D

I saw a demonstration recently where the trainer used a large briefcase as a prop and got a good discussion going about how best to carry it, i.e. held close to the chest, dangled in one hand, balanced on the head. After a lively debate he pulled the handle (that we had all failed to notice) out and wheeled it. I thought it made the point about actually considering whether the lift was necessary rather neatly.
Maciejpl  
#16 Posted : 09 August 2019 06:27:28(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Maciejpl

Hi guys, 

I am preparing to the manual handling training during Safety Day. 

I have a little problem to get the idea how to do the engaging and funny training. After visiting this conversation I have a lot of ideas. Thank You so much! ;-)

hilary  
#17 Posted : 09 August 2019 06:56:04(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
hilary

I get everyone to do a lift with a chair (although for the purposes of the training we use a paper cup to signify a chair).  The attendees are split into groups of two, one has to pass the "chair" to the other and the other has to lift it on to the table.  This is directly after I tell them that they must plan the lift for themselves, risk assess it and ensure that they are in the right position etc.  Nearly every single person simply passes the "chair" to their partner and the partner puts it on the desk in one fluid movement.

We then go back and go over how every lift is an individual task, that person 1 should have taken the "chair" to person 2 and put it down and then person 2 should have assessed it picked it up and put it on the table - 2 different activities rather than two people doing one fluid activity.

While not the most interesting activity in the world it does push the "individual assessment" issue home and they have fun watching others do it and trying to do things differently without any great success tbh.  Mind you, I have a great crowd of people who love play acting so it always ends up a bit of fun.

thanks 1 user thanked hilary for this useful post.
MrBrightside on 09/08/2019(UTC)
MrBrightside  
#18 Posted : 09 August 2019 09:03:24(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
MrBrightside

I do a game of Pass the Pacel. Start off with a very big box that requires a team lift and each time its passed around everyone, it open's to a smaller box and so on. I even put on some music to really set the mood (I used the Rubard and Custard theme once for anyone that remembers that...know your crowd lol).

Well done for making it more fun though!

Maciejpl  
#19 Posted : 09 August 2019 09:24:59(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Maciejpl

Thanks @Hilary and @MrBrightside for sharing. The post is from 2010 but after 9 years can be refreshed. In Poland the subject of manual handling is becoming more and more popular and important. 

I am thinking about buying to this model below for weight lifting demonstration. Do you use this model during your trainings? Thanks for sharing ;)

Martin Fieldingt  
#20 Posted : 09 August 2019 10:10:58(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Martin Fieldingt

Originally Posted by: Maciejpl Go to Quoted Post

Thanks @Hilary and @MrBrightside for sharing. The post is from 2010 but after 9 years can be refreshed. In Poland the subject of manual handling is becoming more and more popular and important. 

I am thinking about buying to this model below for weight lifting demonstration. Do you use this model during your trainings? Thanks for sharing ;)

O'Donnell54548  
#21 Posted : 12 August 2019 19:36:47(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
O'Donnell54548

A common question on these forums, how do I make my training FUN! The answer is why do you think training has to be fun, does your training needs analysis (TNA) identify this as a learning outcome? Back in the 60s when I was at school my Teachers did not care if I was engaged, enabled or entertained, and guess what I learned what they were trying to teach me anyway. I have lost count of the number of times staff have returned from training to tell me how much fun the course was, how it was the best course they have ever been on, only to find a quick quiz can reveal that they have learned little of the subject matter and none of the learning outcomes for which they were actually sent on the training for. In my experience as soon as someone says that they deliver fun training I immediately know that they are not a trainer, they are an entertainer and we have enough clowns in our profession.
MrBrightside  
#22 Posted : 13 August 2019 08:23:35(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
MrBrightside

Originally Posted by: O'Donnell54548 Go to Quoted Post
  In my experience as soon as someone says that they deliver fun training I immediately know that they are not a trainer, they are an entertainer and we have enough clowns in our profession.

Just a tad negative. A training course can be fun and informative. There is nothing worse than a course which, consists of someone standing up the front just reading of endless PowerPoint slides as everyone slowly dies inside. It's not just about what you learn, but how you learn it.

O'Donnell54548  
#23 Posted : 13 August 2019 08:58:08(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
O'Donnell54548

MrBrightside - I am not saying that learning cannot be fun, we all had a favourite subject at school which was normally the one taught by our favourite teacher. My gripe is the assumption that anyone with a NEBOSH certificate can teach health & safety. Being a practitioner is completely different from being a trainer and this is obvious from the types of questions you get on the forum with regards to training.

A competent trainer would carry out a TNA to establish what the attendees on the course need to learn, they would profile the target audience to identify different learning styles. From this information they would develope their lesson plan, detailing how they would meet the varied learning styles to achieve the learning outcomes. With this they would identify methods of constant confirmation, during, and after the session that the learning needs are being met.

But no that is not what happens on so any occassions, and the reason why so much H&S training is poor in content and delivery, and therefore 'boring'.

Hands up out there, how many of you start your preperation for training with a power point presentation? Not forgetting the cartoons, funny safety pictures and notable qoutes.   

hilary  
#24 Posted : 13 August 2019 09:35:40(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
hilary

I deliver courses that people actually want to attend and they have even been referred to as "fun".  They are delivered in a lighthearted manner with icebreaker fun games, entertaining breakout sessions and group work.  The message is important so there is serious study to do as well and serious tasks are set and completed in order to achieve the intended outcome. 

One example we set is the "communication exercise" as part of the behavioural safety course.  We tell all the attendees that this a communication exercise to see what you remember then choose three volunteers.  Two of the volunteers are sent out of the room and we then read out a list of three quite complicated items (involving numbers and locations) that we have on a sheet and tell them to remember these items and pass them on to the next person.  The first two are straight forward but the last item states that there is a bomb in the elevator and they have been chosen to disarm it by cutting the wires in a particular order and we hand them wire cutters.

At this point, the course attendee is supposed to stop and think and then look for the bomb but do they?  No, of course not, we have told them it is a communication exercise so they duly repeat all three items to the next volunteer (normally very badly with loads of errors).  At this point you hope the next person identifies that there is a bomb ......... of course not, they simply repeat everything they remember (which by this time is absolutely hysterical) to the next person.

At the end of the exercise I show a picture of a big explosion and tell them exactly how many times I have been blown up running this course because not one of them thought about what they were being told and processed the information .....

It's a fun exercise but with a very serious message attached - people get it and remember!

I am a qualified teacher/trainer. Training can be fun.

O'Donnell54548  
#25 Posted : 13 August 2019 09:44:49(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
O'Donnell54548

hilary - I agree, but you are a trainer. Too many people out there are delivering in-house training who are not. Think about it, how much of the NEBOSH, NVQ or other H&S training for professionals out there covers how to plan and deliver training?

thanks 1 user thanked O'Donnell54548 for this useful post.
hilary on 13/08/2019(UTC)
hilary  
#26 Posted : 13 August 2019 10:02:04(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
hilary

Originally Posted by: O'Donnell54548 Go to Quoted Post

hilary - I agree, but you are a trainer. Too many people out there are delivering in-house training who are not. Think about it, how much of the NEBOSH, NVQ or other H&S training for professionals out there covers how to plan and deliver training?

True enough, I learnt an awful lot from my trainers training course tbh.

Maciejpl  
#27 Posted : 14 August 2019 13:57:07(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Maciejpl

hilary  , O'Donnell54548, MrBrightside   thanks for your discussion. Me&wife we have safety business which is delivering safety trainings with unconventional methods in trainings. We are using lots of engaging, awareness biuliding, funny methods during Safety Days, gamification and compulsory/obligatory periodic trainings. 

O'Donnell54548 I undesrtand your point of view that traininng should not be funny, should deliver knowledge and meet training objectives. However, ice-breakers, engaging games, funny comparison should be there also. 

I have oredered yestrerday walking stick, 4lb weight, model for demonstrating liftin, herniated intervertebral disc and I will everything include in my safety day which i will be delivering. I will use also a lot of boxes, brush stick and will learn them how to develop a movement pattern, how to bend your knees and hips. Pleas believe me that about 90% my colleagues is not bending knees...

I do not want use only power point. I need a lot of training aids and ideas. So, Thank You for this converstaion and inspiration ;-)

Ps. sorry for my english mistakes.. I'm developing this area ;-)

thanks 1 user thanked Maciejpl for this useful post.
hilary on 15/08/2019(UTC)
Users browsing this topic
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.