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Mark-W  
#1 Posted : 13 August 2019 15:56:15(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

1 of my clients wants to do away with their metal cage which currently stores their gas cylinders. They have just aquired a nearby property and on the side of the building is a brick storage area, it is concrete block wall with a red brick face. It was used as store for oil, the plastic bund is still inside but easily removed. Anyway, it has a mesh gate with no threshold to contain vapour, it has air bricks high and low on the 2 ends and a light fitting, not sure what it's called but I've seen the same in the ammo bunker when I was serving so I'm happy that it is compliant.

It is well away from any entry point to the building. But I can't see anywhere, where it statesd that metal mesh should be used for storage of cylinders, just that it should be well ventilated. Are we pushing the limits of the regs by using this brick store.

Messey  
#2 Posted : 13 August 2019 19:28:14(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Messey

Outdoor storage is always the best way to go, and a cage is a costeffective and simple way to achive safe stoarge.

Despite the mesh gate and air bricks, this brick store sounds like it will be defined as indoor storage. That is far more problematic

Have a look at section 5.8 here for outdoor storage and 5.15 for inddor storage.  

http://www.bcga.co.uk/assets/publications/CP44.pdf

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Mark-W on 14/08/2019(UTC)
A Kurdziel  
#3 Posted : 14 August 2019 08:47:55(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

Look at the published guidance. Gas cylinder storage is not just a matter of having an “approved” design for your store. More important is what sort of gasses you are storing eg fuel gases or oxygen., how much you are storing-one of two cylinders is very different to a twenty cylinder pack, the overall location (are the cylinders likely to be damaged, are they accessible etc). Basically it is down to a risk assessment taking into account all of the factors which are described in the guidance.  

 

thanks 3 users thanked A Kurdziel for this useful post.
biker1 on 14/08/2019(UTC), jwk on 14/08/2019(UTC), Mark-W on 14/08/2019(UTC)
Mark-W  
#4 Posted : 14 August 2019 12:26:33(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

Many thanks for all the comments. The gas in question is 8 X 15kg ( I think, been a while since I dealt with gas cylinders)  gas cylinders for the works forklift. No other gasses are used by the company

biker1  
#5 Posted : 15 August 2019 11:20:26(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
biker1

If it's LPG, you also need to ensure that the storage facility is well away from basements or other low lying areas, since in the event of a leak, being heavier than air, it will gather at the lowest point, which can catch you out, both from an asphyxiation and ignition risk point of view.

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Mark-W on 16/08/2019(UTC)
CptBeaky  
#6 Posted : 15 August 2019 11:34:20(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
CptBeaky

I agree with Messey. Stored out side, away from the building in a (locked) metal cage seems pretty standard. I have always worked with LPG forkilifts and this has always been the storage solution we have used. We have never had any concerrns raised by either insurance or the HSE.

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Mark-W on 16/08/2019(UTC)
Brian Hagyard  
#7 Posted : 15 August 2019 12:36:27(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Brian Hagyard

As its LPG you might want to look at the appropriate code of practice from the trade association. During the inspection programme run on LPG by the enforcement authorities a few years ago after the Glasgow explosion these were what they refered to.

https://www.liquidgasuk.org/resources/codes-of-practice

Need to get your check book out mind as they charge for them!

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Mark-W on 16/08/2019(UTC)
chris42  
#8 Posted : 15 August 2019 12:41:03(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris42

You can store inside and as above, the document CP44 will talk you though the issues, and it also has a chart about how far away from other utilities. I would treat this outside room as if it was inside with relation to the requirements noted. It sounds possible, but only you know the exact site layout.

I would say though when I first started where I am now we had a brick built room outside of the main building with mesh door and some wall / roof vents and the delivery driver refused to put the new bottles in there! So, you need to get your assessment /controls spot on. Outside is preferable, but not absolute, as there may be other factors in play that may mean inside is better or the only option if no outside space.

Chris

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Mark-W on 16/08/2019(UTC)
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