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Shaw23650  
#1 Posted : 28 July 2020 10:39:11(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Shaw23650

Does anyone have any experience/opinion on allowing two remote workers to work in the same house/domestic setting if they ask permission to do so and say they will follow all necessary precautions? How has this been "permissioned" by anyone?

A Kurdziel  
#2 Posted : 28 July 2020 11:32:16(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

The government speaks with forked tongues. On one had they want things to return to as normal as possible ie they want people to come into work and pay their taxes but they also want effective measures in place to prevent the spread of Covid 19. The thing is, the best way to stop the spread of Covid 19 is to avoid meeting other people unless you have to. Any face to face contact with others has to be justified (IMHO). So if you are doing something that absolutely requires two people working together then ok but just getting together to catch up is probably hard to justify.  When I looked after a 100 or so peripatetic workers (long before the current unpleasantness) we did not encourage them to meet up in their own homes. They could either use drop-in/touch down hubs if they were available or just meet up in a coffee shop etc.  Using private homes as a shared base felt like an imposition. I would never suggest such a solution. Of course it happened but never officially, so nobody ever had to apply for permission for this to happen.

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Shaw23650 on 28/07/2020(UTC)
Shaw23650  
#3 Posted : 28 July 2020 11:51:06(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Shaw23650

Originally Posted by: A Kurdziel Go to Quoted Post

The government speaks with forked tongues. On one had they want things to return to as normal as possible ie they want people to come into work and pay their taxes but they also want effective measures in place to prevent the spread of Covid 19. The thing is, the best way to stop the spread of Covid 19 is to avoid meeting other people unless you have to. Any face to face contact with others has to be justified (IMHO). So if you are doing something that absolutely requires two people working together then ok but just getting together to catch up is probably hard to justify.  When I looked after a 100 or so peripatetic workers (long before the current unpleasantness) we did not encourage them to meet up in their own homes. They could either use drop-in/touch down hubs if they were available or just meet up in a coffee shop etc.  Using private homes as a shared base felt like an imposition. I would never suggest such a solution. Of course it happened but never officially, so nobody ever had to apply for permission for this to happen.

- thanks, yes i must say i have doubts about liability, insurances, etc, never mind the obvious risks. The trouble is quite a few more junior staff are living in small flats and feeling isolated. The only thing i ca see is they form a "social bubble" between pairs, and that is not a work-thing, thats a "social" thing, and the employer doesnt need to intervene or "permit"....

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A Kurdziel on 28/07/2020(UTC)
stevedm  
#4 Posted : 28 July 2020 13:26:09(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
stevedm

currently going through and 'COVID aging' everyone...same scenario comes up almost every day...

If they are classed as Low vulnerability then there isn't really a problem to them, however thier possibility to cross infect others who may be classed as High vulnerable...and they won't know who they are...with the one to one sessions the social distancing and hygiene is finally sinking in with the guys...still a struggle at times...

Brian Hagyard  
#5 Posted : 28 July 2020 15:08:21(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Brian Hagyard

 So in your situation these people may be socialing on an evening in a "bubble" but we are saying no at work - for me as you say the main thing is insurance

As we keep saying how on earth are we meant to follow this guidance - I have crews if fixed bubbles in vehicles who when they come back to base cannot undertsand why they cannot sit at the  same lunch table! But then if i let them sit together other people want to join in - anyone know of a good plasterer that can come fix my wall?

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A Kurdziel on 29/07/2020(UTC)
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