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Stephen Hill  
#1 Posted : 09 October 2020 10:41:43(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Stephen Hill

Hi Everyone, 

I have been tasked by my director to look into providing or source Manual Handling training for a work colleague, this normally would not phase me but the situation is a little unique, my work colleage six months ago recovered from colostomy surgery and is require to have a stoma bag for the forseeable future, about 2 months ago my colleague took a fall, and the fall resulted in a hernia at the stoma site. My colleague has been off work for almost 18 months and our employer are looking for a phased back to work program, which would include specific Manual Handling training. What would be your advice in regards to under taking Manual Handling in this situation? My thought was the training should not be conducted with the hernia awaiting assessment/ operation , it would not be advisable. My colleague is a surveyor and is required from time to time to access loft spaces as part of his role.

Any advice would be greatly welcomed.

Roundtuit  
#2 Posted : 09 October 2020 10:58:50(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Speak to your occupational health advisor or ask the colleague to obtain an opinion from their doctor / consultant about undertaking such training.

I would suspect that any hernia/stoma would be under recommendation to avoid heavy lifting or exercise for several weeks post corrective surgery so whilst awaiting the operation is very probably also don't.

Roundtuit  
#3 Posted : 09 October 2020 10:58:50(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Speak to your occupational health advisor or ask the colleague to obtain an opinion from their doctor / consultant about undertaking such training.

I would suspect that any hernia/stoma would be under recommendation to avoid heavy lifting or exercise for several weeks post corrective surgery so whilst awaiting the operation is very probably also don't.

AcornsConsult  
#4 Posted : 09 October 2020 16:09:02(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
AcornsConsult

Perhaps getting the employee to get advise from their doctor/consultant and then adapt the MH training.  If nothing else it may actually set limits as to what and how the employee can work.  So, rather than providing MH training on how to lift and throw 2cwt bags of sugar around as per a normal employee, they may actually need training  and help to move paper clips across a table.  So its setting ou training to suit the employee rather than make the employee satisfy the training

peter gotch  
#5 Posted : 09 October 2020 17:53:06(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
peter gotch

....and simply accessing loft spaces without carrying anything could be problematic. One for a medical opinion (taking into account the individual's own views) to enable you to decide what this person could do during phased return and what "reasonable adjustments" are needed.

Edited by user 09 October 2020 17:53:53(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user thanked peter gotch for this useful post.
aud on 13/10/2020(UTC)
Brian Hagyard  
#6 Posted : 12 October 2020 07:22:51(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Brian Hagyard

Or maybe we go back to what is required and make sure we have eliminated all manual handling where we can, provided mechanical assistance, etc. - before we go so far down the hierarchy of controls and look at training! Sorry but "manual handling training" is a bit of pet hate - see two many companies relying on it!

thanks 1 user thanked Brian Hagyard for this useful post.
aud on 13/10/2020(UTC)
stevedm  
#7 Posted : 13 October 2020 07:56:26(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
stevedm

It does sound that your the person has other complications that may affect thier work...it is fine generally to work with a hiatus hernia so long as the activity does not strain that part...the person needs a full occupational health assessment to make sure that the they use techniques and practices that help them work but take into account thier issues...just be careful when getting an assessment as some OH providers don't actually give you occupational assessments they need to see the activity and what that person will be doing to make a full assessment....remember the results are medical in confidence and need to be treated as such... 

Any issues drop me a PM ..:)

toe  
#8 Posted : 20 October 2020 22:47:04(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
toe

On a personal note:- when wating for my operation to fix a hernia many moons ago, I was advised (and deffinatly took it) not to lift anything prior to the operation. If you had a 'tear' in your shopping bag would you lift up the bag full of shopping? Just saying!

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