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mikecarr  
#1 Posted : 27 August 2015 09:50:32(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
mikecarr

HI all i've been asked to carry out a stress risk assessment for an employee who has just retuned to work after a stress related absesnce. Looking at the managment standards there were failures in most areas in this particular case I was thinking to just use the usual 5 steps to carrying out an RA and using the managment standards as the hazards. Is this the right way to go about it? The other option is to do an acton plan using the standards as action points Any advice welcome!! Cheers Mike
AllanFS  
#2 Posted : 27 August 2015 11:50:23(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
AllanFS

Mike PM me & I will sent one over.
RayRapp  
#3 Posted : 27 August 2015 13:46:10(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
RayRapp

Mike It's been a while since I last tucked into the HSE's Management Standards. However I can confirm that doing a stress risk assessment based on the Standards is problematic. If you don't get this right the document could be used against the company if there was any civil claim sometime in the future. Doing an action plan makes sense to me, but nevertheless it is still fraught with potential problems. I assume from your original posting the stress is work related and therefore I suggest HR/OH as well as senior management may need to get involved at some stage. PM me if you want to discuss this further. Ray
YJHR  
#4 Posted : 11 October 2017 11:14:22(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
YJHR

Originally Posted by: AllanFS Go to Quoted Post
Mike PM me & I will sent one over.

Hi,

Do you have a copy of a stress risk assessment you could send over?

Best wishes,

Yasmin

sappery760  
#5 Posted : 11 October 2017 13:08:42(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
sappery760

U really need to now about stress and all its surrounding effects etc. and private info about the person and their work* situation before u attempt an assessment [u might even be part of the problem?!] - *if it is a home situation that is impacting on work the persons doc [noting that most doctors are not stress experts] should help manage the issue remembering that U can only try to solve work issues

 U with HR [but HR are usually part of the problem] should facilitate but not undertake / be responsible for the accessment nor its outcome actions and gender issues can come into play when assessing and the assessor/s needs to know the full and real reason for the stress issue which could include private medical areas

my advice is to get in a competent ['competence' is the problem] outsider who has no axe to grind and the person should then be able to confide / work with them remembering that many people will not want to participate properly with their own assessment  best of luck

Woolf13  
#6 Posted : 11 October 2017 13:34:37(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Woolf13

Hi,

Please see link below:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/

This is the HSE's advice area on stress and there are links to various information and templates. In particular there are example "stress" risk assessments which you may find useful.

I hope this helps?

KieranD  
#7 Posted : 12 October 2017 16:53:17(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
KieranD

Mike

Since there are both subjective and objective perspectives on work-related stress, and the employee you're concerned with may have a history of stress-pronenesss (which can have implications for stress levels of other employees including the supervisor/line manager), it's advisable to ask both the employee and the supervisor about their assessment of stress levels of identified 'stressors', i.e. sources of stress.  And to ask for agreement of both to your monitoring the stress levels over the next 3 months.

It's also worth assessment to what extent if any there is a culture of 'Presenteeism' (employees turning up for work when they are ill) in your organization.

KieranD  
#8 Posted : 15 October 2017 20:17:34(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
KieranD

Mike

Appendices in a report, 'Barriers to and facilitators of return to work after  sick leave in workers with common mental disorders', commissioned by IOSH Research Committee and written by researchers at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, offer many very useful questions relevan to your needs.

The report can be downloaded free from this IOSH website

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