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baal  
#1 Posted : 15 June 2017 16:38:18(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
baal

Hi All How far would you need to go to demonstrate competance in the event of accident involving a trailer? Before putting our trailers out onto the public highway they undergo a thorough documented visual inspection. However, concerns have been raised by staff that visual inspections are not enough, and there should be an annual service schedule in place carried out by suitably qualified person. Consequently, those staff who carry out the visual inspection of the trailers are stating on their paperwork that the trailers are not fit for the road. Do they have a point or is this over kill? Thanks advance.
DProsser  
#2 Posted : 15 June 2017 19:19:17(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
DProsser

Hi baal,

I would suggest you take their declaration on the paperwork seriously. If there was an accident and it had been reported un-fit then the company will be liable for prosecution. It would also be morally wrong to put an unsafe trailer on the road.

If you believe they are lying on the inspection documents you could either inspect the vehicles with them and ask them to explain why they think it is unsafe which may catch them out or get an independant inspection to determine the condition of the trailers. If they are lying, then this would become a HR issue. 

As it is a piece of work equipment - The provision and use of workplace equipment (PUWER) requires equipment to be "maintained in an efficient state, in efficient working order and in good repair." You will achive this by planned preventative maintenace before parts wear out and condition based maintenace when parts need to be changed due to wear. 

I would like to think maintaining the trailers including an annual service would be cheaper than replacing the trailer or the cost of an accident. 

Hope this helps. 

Stuart Smiles  
#3 Posted : 16 June 2017 01:02:01(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Stuart Smiles

get a copy of the guide to maintaining roadworthiness, and have a look at the vehicle maintenance schedules table within. for goods vehicles most would be using a starting point of every 6 weeks, including at least 4 laden brake tests each year (of which one could be mot). if you have a transport manager consult them. 

you could also check the transport manager cpc course notes available from eos training or trade associations, rha/fta for specialist advice.

for training on inspections, there are consultants who can do it, or speak to your existing transport people. issue guidance to drivers on what inspections you want doing in writing and record that they have watched the dvsa videos on the youtube page - check it out. 

you need to confirm what competence means to you and then to ensure they are doing it, both with nil defects and defect reporting, to someone responsible who can take the items out of service. 

you can also look at the senior traffic commissioner statutory guidance on transport managers (includes driver responsibilities). you need a system to make sure everything on the road is safe. if you have any questions please look at the referenced documents in the first instance. but pm if you have questions.

baal  
#4 Posted : 16 June 2017 08:26:06(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
baal

Just to clarify, these are single and twin axle trailers towed by commercial Van/Landrover.

Roundtuit  
#5 Posted : 16 June 2017 09:38:20(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

grim72  
#6 Posted : 16 June 2017 09:43:01(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
grim72

I've sent you some info by PM baal, hope it helps

Ron Hunter  
#7 Posted : 16 June 2017 14:37:17(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ron Hunter

I assume we're talking about unbraked trailers. The only things I can think of that wouldn't be covered by competent visual exam and the action of hitching/unhitching is the wheel bearings. A relatively simple matter to jack the trailer up and check for rumble-free running, say once a Year? (I'm assuming you've some idea of the mileage these things are covering).

Also possible that cracked welds etc. on the underside might go unnoticed, but unlikely if they're looked after and used responsibly (no overloads, unsuitable terrain, etc.)

Why not get the people doing your Van and Landrover MoTs to give them a once-over every 12 months?

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