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SPR  
#1 Posted : 16 June 2017 20:14:57(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
SPR

Hi all, I'm trying to find out exactly what the correct colours are that need to be worn to comply with BS EN 471. I'm on the understanding its yellow orange and red, but then I have read elsewhere it's only yellow and orange?? Anyone guide me to the correct information. I don't have a copy of BS EN 471 so I'm just reading snippets from the internet.
Roundtuit  
#2 Posted : 16 June 2017 21:41:25(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

the current standard BS EN ISO 20471 does not stipulate colours. Yellow and Orange are just the most commonly supplied If you are working in the rail sector GoRT stipulates orange otherwise so long as the garment meets the requirements you can have any colour the manufacturer can supply
RayRapp  
#3 Posted : 20 June 2017 23:18:47(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
RayRapp

Further to the above post, yellow is adopted by those working on highways (don't know why) and orange is mandatory on the railway - because yellow can look like green from a distance to a train driver. 

Ron Hunter  
#4 Posted : 21 June 2017 16:39:06(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ron Hunter

Apparently, "yellow gets noticed faster than any other colour.  For instance, in one’s peripheral vision, studies have shown that humans notice the colour yellow 1.24 times faster than another eye-catching colour, red. Yellow is also particularly visible in the early morning and evening light"

The above from an article discussing a 1930's study into the best colour for school buses.

Railways used to use yellow signals. Presumably another reason for orange hiviz.

Hedward  
#5 Posted : 22 June 2017 12:37:00(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Hedward

Originally Posted by: Roundtuit Go to Quoted Post
the current standard BS EN ISO 20471 does not stipulate colours.

I think you may be mistaken Roundtuit...

BS EN ISO 20471 says that the background colour of a garment must be either: Flourescent Yellow, Flourescent Orange/Red or Flourescent Red and gives the required chromaticity coordinates (whatever they are!) for each of those colours.

thanks 1 user thanked Hedward for this useful post.
Roundtuit on 22/06/2017(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#6 Posted : 22 June 2017 19:23:01(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Standard blindness - thankfully spotted before someone spent money on EN471 products on-line

SPR  
#7 Posted : 23 June 2017 18:55:30(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
SPR

So my next question is would blue, black and pink coloured hi viz be worn only in very low risk environments...

Jane Blunt  
#8 Posted : 24 June 2017 08:21:26(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Jane Blunt

Originally Posted by: SPR Go to Quoted Post

So my next question is would blue, black and pink coloured hi viz be worn only in very low risk environments...

Isn't that a bit of an oxymoron? If it is a very low risk environment, is there a need for Hi Viz? Conversely, if you need Hi Viz, why compromise its effectiveness? I have no problem with pink (although not everyone would want to wear pink), but black? Black is no longer Hi Viz (except at night if it has reflective strips).

RayRapp  
#9 Posted : 24 June 2017 08:48:49(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
RayRapp

I have seen a group of school children wearing pink hi-vis when being shepherded along the street assisted by school teachers. I guess the pink gets noticed more than the ubiquitous yellow you see worn by tradesmen,  delivery drivers, etc. 

peter gotch  
#10 Posted : 26 June 2017 13:58:56(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
peter gotch

There was a recent study of 12 waste operatives working at a retail park. Wearing yellow hi-viz, only an average of 4 spotted by shoppers. When they switched to pink, the average went up to 8. Yellow is ubiquitous, pink is unusual.
Hsquared14  
#11 Posted : 26 June 2017 15:02:06(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Hsquared14

Lots of interesting stuff on colour theory on the internet.  I work in a ware house environment where yellow hi-vis is mandatory but I am considering an alternative colour for visitors so that they stand out from our employees.  For reasons I won't go into here we can't use orange or red so I am considering purple or pink!!  As they won't be working but do need to be identifiable and not confused with staff I don't think strict conformance to the standard is an issue.

Bob Hansler  
#12 Posted : 26 June 2017 16:26:05(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Bob Hansler

Pink is the new black

Bob

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