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Pinnington20914  
#1 Posted : 08 February 2018 15:32:22(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Pinnington20914

I'm looking for teching materials suitable to engage children of junior school age in Health and Safety. It's a tough gig and thankfully I'm not delivering it but I'd like to support my fellow practioner as much as I can.

if anyone has any ideas or materials to offer I would be greatful.

WatsonD  
#2 Posted : 08 February 2018 15:57:43(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
WatsonD

You have to engage on their level, start stating Health and Safety at Work Act and banging on about regs and you've most likely lost them. Say its about "Taking care of yourself and others, and we call it health and safety" and I think they will better grasp the idea.

Sounds challenging but, ultimately could be very rewarding - if you can get them to engage. I would also suggest lots of visual prompts and perhaps utilise games and role-play.

Good luck to your colleague!

Charlie Brown  
#3 Posted : 08 February 2018 17:45:26(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Charlie Brown

It seems all kids will sit and watch tv for hours so maybe start with some "funniest home videos" of people falling off tables and chairs and tell them how bad it could end up??

Dunno, glad it isn't me! As WatsonD said, good luck to your colleague.

jodieclark1510  
#4 Posted : 09 February 2018 09:35:19(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
jodieclark1510

I'm not sure if fire safety is something you will touch upon- when I do open days volunteering with the fire service, we have a set up of a bedroom and a kitchen with some hazards in them. We then get the kids to point out what the hazard is and why its a hazard- the amount of parents who get dropped in it when their kids say about the straighteners being left on the bed  or phones being put on charge under pillows!

biker1  
#5 Posted : 09 February 2018 09:50:01(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
biker1

If you can get your hands on it, a safety video from some years ago called 'No Going Back' can be useful. It's about an accident suffered by a singer in a band, so would appeal to the X Factor generation.

Clark34486  
#6 Posted : 09 February 2018 09:54:17(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Clark34486

Originally Posted by: biker1 Go to Quoted Post

If you can get your hands on it, a safety video from some years ago called 'No Going Back' can be useful. It's about an accident suffered by a singer in a band, so would appeal to the X Factor generation.

That's part of the IOSH MS pack training materials, the lead is played by Kate Beckinsale (her dad of the famous Porridge comedy and Hollywood actress)

It's so old looking now though.....

Bigmac1  
#7 Posted : 09 February 2018 17:37:00(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Bigmac1

Childs play videos

We (IOSH South Cumbria) are doing something similar with year 10 pupils.

Just talk to them at their level is my advice.

wstuarth  
#8 Posted : 12 February 2018 17:48:00(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
wstuarth

I have been involved in something similar and used balloons to bring interst to the session. I had some of the youngsters either blowing them up or holding inflated balloons

The full involvement of the youngsters is up to you, but whilst blowing up the balloon (one or two breaths at a time, then stopping for a chat) I covered things like substances causing injury - using balloon latex as the starting point then talking about other substances that they might know) then talking about who could and could not blow up a balloon, leading onto "competence" and the need to be sure that everyone was trained and or able to do the tasks they were asked to do, then after another couple of breaths (and some acting) talked about feeling dizzy and hence a disussion about first aid and the need to have the right bits in place in the first aid kit - all the time bringing the risk assessment threads together. Ultimately talking about creating a set of rules that make work safe (Safe policy and arrangements)

Depending on the time you have you can weave in lost of things about colour of the balloon, and how that colour might feature in signage, etc etc.

At the end of the session (depending on numbers) everyone or around 6 or 7 folk would have inflated balloons - now get one to burst a balloon and ask them to gauge the noise , then get 2 to burst at the same time, then the rest - ( i used sitting on them, not quite as co-ordinated as a pin might be, but much more fun for youngsters) and that allowed me to finish off talking about noise and vibration with a partticular reference to the desire of youngsters to play loud music via headphones (quick life lesson there too).

The blowing up of the balloons held their attention and the bursting of them certainly made them remember the session.

The important thing is that if needs to be interactive and fun for them and you !!

Enjoy and let us all know how you get on

Hsquared14  
#9 Posted : 13 February 2018 09:19:18(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Hsquared14

Participated in a great one with a school some years back - got the kids hi-vis vests (also useful for the walk to and from school in the dark days of winter) and clipboards and then off around the school and grounds looking for things that could cause an accident.  Came back shared what they had found, grouped them into type of accident (most were STF) and had some good discussions about how they could be fixed.   Had a great lecture from a 7 year old on how to lay slabs safely and perfectly flat (dad is a builder specialising in hard landscaping).  It was fun for all involved.  I would ditch the "chalk and talk" and go totally interactive, forget slides and videos get them moving, out and about and actively looking at things. 

lorna  
#10 Posted : 13 February 2018 10:53:47(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
lorna

Napo isn't bad - & there is a reasonable teachers pack complete with a brightly coloured spot the hazards poster.

andybz  
#11 Posted : 14 February 2018 16:27:19(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
andybz

I had a similar experience to HSquared14.  Did a talk to my son's Year 5 class - what a parent does at work type thing.

Can't remember exactly what I did but spent most of the time discussing items around the class room and the associated hazard and risk.  I found that the pupils had a really good feel for risk (its real meaning) - much better than lots of people who post on this forum. 

Go with an open mind and you will learn as much as they do.  Certainly not something to be worried about or try to avoid.  Sticking a video on would be a missed opportunity in my mind, although a couple of very short clips would be OK.

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