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simonnunn  
#1 Posted : 12 March 2018 17:05:51(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
simonnunn

Good Afternoon,

I've not long been a member and new to the h and s world. Awaiting my Nebosh ngc results. I've come from the military and been doing certified first aid training.

I've had a question put to me, if I may pick the collective brains of fellow members.

Can an internal supervisor of 25 years experience conduct in house training. (Removals company).

I appreciate all awarding bodies set the standards they require, formal teaching qualifications and subject matter. so the company can set its requirements demonstrating an obvious work experience from the supervisor. So in theory the answer is yes.

Would it stand up though in the SFAR test under investigation?

I appreciate as well the potential of teaching bad practices from that work experience.

Thanks in advance.
Kate  
#2 Posted : 12 March 2018 19:44:46(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kate

I'd say you need more than just work experience to be a competent trainer.  You also need theoretical knowledge of the subject-matter and skill at training.

What is the subject of the training to be?

thanks 2 users thanked Kate for this useful post.
Charlie Brown on 12/03/2018(UTC), simonnunn on 16/03/2018(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#3 Posted : 12 March 2018 19:52:33(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Charlie Brown on 12/03/2018(UTC), simonnunn on 16/03/2018(UTC)
Charlie Brown  
#4 Posted : 12 March 2018 22:33:45(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Charlie Brown

I agree with Kate and advise you to look at the link Roundtuit posted as well.

For the cost of a Managers team building night out you could put your supervisor through the PTLLS course and fix a lot of your problem but the supervisor should also be able to demonstrate a theoretical knowlege of the subject as well.

thanks 1 user thanked Charlie Brown for this useful post.
simonnunn on 16/03/2018(UTC)
A Kurdziel  
#5 Posted : 13 March 2018 09:35:32(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

To be a good trainer you need three things:

  1. Understand (and believe in) the idea of H&S in particular risk assessment and how it applies in the real world.
  2. Understand  the area of work that you will be looking at; me I would avoid talking about CDM; I do not have any hands on experience in that area but COSHH I can  talk about until hell freezes over.
  3. Have empathy with your audience: I have seen people just not connect with the trainees. Once we had a course run by an old school H&S guy with a background in industry (gas and oil, I think) and he managed to alienate his audience of scientists and technical people just through his style and approach. This is an area where the internal trainer has a clear advantage.

Will a piece of paper saying that you have completed a particular course make you all of these: I am not sure?  Do you really believe that you have these three things? If yes go on then run your own course.  

Edited by user 13 March 2018 09:36:22(UTC)  | Reason: spelling error as usual

thanks 1 user thanked A Kurdziel for this useful post.
simonnunn on 16/03/2018(UTC)
chris.packham  
#6 Posted : 13 March 2018 10:16:01(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris.packham

I agree with the above. However, what is essential in my experience is enthusiasm and passion. I have lost count of the number of times I have sat in a conference listening to a speaker on a topic of considerable interest, only to lose concentration due to the boring presentation creating the impression that the speaker was not really interested in what they were presenting. 

You need to get the audience/participants to believe in you and what you are saying. Consider yourself to be an actor on the stage, say Hamlet. You need to be able to make the audience believe that you are that prince and the stage really is the castle in Denmark. 

One of the most useful pieces of advice that I received many years ago from an experienced presenter is: Don't keep still! If you do the presenters don't move their heads, neck muscles tighten and attention wanders. So move around and keep then guessing what is coming next. I often keep a couple of boxes handy, into which I can dive from time to time to produce an object to illustrate a point I am making. They never quite know what is coming next!

Just a few thoughts from someone who does quite a lot of speaking and training. Hope it is of some help.

Chris

thanks 4 users thanked chris.packham for this useful post.
A Kurdziel on 13/03/2018(UTC), Charlie Brown on 13/03/2018(UTC), lorna on 13/03/2018(UTC), simonnunn on 16/03/2018(UTC)
A Kurdziel  
#7 Posted : 13 March 2018 11:34:22(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

Originally Posted by: chris.packham Go to Quoted Post

I agree with the above. However, what is essential in my experience is enthusiasm and passion. I have lost count of the number of times I have sat in a conference listening to a speaker on a topic of considerable interest, only to lose concentration due to the boring presentation creating the impression that the speaker was not really interested in what they were presenting. 

You need to get the audience/participants to believe in you and what you are saying. Consider yourself to be an actor on the stage, say Hamlet. You need to be able to make the audience believe that you are that prince and the stage really is the castle in Denmark. 

One of the most useful pieces of advice that I received many years ago from an experienced presenter is: Don't keep still! If you do the presenters don't move their heads, neck muscles tighten and attention wanders. So move around and keep then guessing what is coming next. I often keep a couple of boxes handy, into which I can dive from time to time to produce an object to illustrate a point I am making. They never quite know what is coming next!

Just a few thoughts from someone who does quite a lot of speaking and training. Hope it is of some help.

Chris

Agreed! Two of the most tedious days of my life involved watching a presentation about 18001 by someone who could not really be bothered. They sat motionless throughout, spoke monotonously   and made no real attempt to engage with anybody. That’s a definition of a lack of empathy if ever there was one.

Charlie Brown  
#8 Posted : 13 March 2018 11:39:43(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Charlie Brown

I agree, enthusiasm is a key component, as is participation.

I used to ask the participants to read key points from slides in a "around the room" fashion and would pick people to say what a particular statement means to them, e.g. "What do you think it means to consider the load?"

I don't think doing a course is all there is to being an effective trainer, in fact some people could do all the courses in the world and never be any good at it but it is a good start because it gives an understanding of what makes a good or bad session.

thanks 1 user thanked Charlie Brown for this useful post.
A Kurdziel on 13/03/2018(UTC)
jamiehoyle  
#9 Posted : 13 March 2018 13:44:58(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
jamiehoyle

If you are going to use Power Point for training (and it can be a very good tool), please please, for the love of God, don't face the screen and read word for word what is displayed. That is the quickest way to lose me.

If you know your stuff (and you really should), then a few key words or phrases should help you cover all of the relevant information.

A Kurdziel  
#10 Posted : 13 March 2018 16:26:27(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

Originally Posted by: jamiehoyle Go to Quoted Post

If you are going to use Power Point for training (and it can be a very good tool), please please, for the love of God, don't face the screen and read word for word what is displayed. That is the quickest way to lose me.

If you know your stuff (and you really should), then a few key words or phrases should help you cover all of the relevant information.

You've been to that OHSAS presentation as well...all two days of it!

Bigmac1  
#11 Posted : 13 March 2018 19:43:35(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Bigmac1

The question was can the guy with 25 years experience deliver internal training!

Yes he can, there is no legal requirement to have PTTLS, KTTLS or any oth TTLS for internal, in house, non accredited training.

The question wasn't what makes a good trainer etc.

However I agree with most comments that it is not best practice or even good practice, and it may not be affective either but its certainly allowed.

thanks 1 user thanked Bigmac1 for this useful post.
simonnunn on 16/03/2018(UTC)
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