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CdC  
#1 Posted : 12 March 2018 17:41:44(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
CdC

Dear IOSH community,

I am looking for a definite minimum safe distance between machinery (or is this probably based on fire escape minimium sidth?) as well as for a scenario, where a machine is pushed so far back, that it is not easy to reach a service hatch only with outstretching the arm (and in contravention if PUWER). However, is there guidance on numbers in mm somewhere that can be used as a basis for getting the machines moved? Anything in the harmonised standards?

Thank you!

mihaibertea  
#2 Posted : 12 March 2018 18:15:37(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
mihaibertea

Hi, 

Try the PD 5304:2005, I don't have a copy but I believe that it will be someone with a copy. If not you can buy it from here https://shop.bsigroup.com/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030127359 

thanks 1 user thanked mihaibertea for this useful post.
CdC on 13/03/2018(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#3 Posted : 12 March 2018 19:45:08(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Machinery access is to some extent set by the designer - they have to assume clear routes of access to all sides unless it is a bespoke contracted build for a particular installation.

If you then choose to "shove it against the wall" so that a maintenance port is not readily and easily accessible your installation would be contrary to the O&M documentation. Where this has not been specified in the documentation clarification should have been sought.

PUWER tries to address this gap between design and actual use placing duties upon the user to assess their work environment in relation to the equipment.

PD 5304 is currenty 2014 not 2005

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Charlie Brown on 12/03/2018(UTC), CdC on 13/03/2018(UTC)
Charlie Brown  
#4 Posted : 12 March 2018 22:40:46(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Charlie Brown

In addition to PUWER you need to consult the manufacturers' specs for the placement of the machines in question and you also need to be aware of the need for safe access/egress, both in terms of traffic through the building and in case of an emergency.

thanks 1 user thanked Charlie Brown for this useful post.
CdC on 13/03/2018(UTC)
Hsquared14  
#5 Posted : 13 March 2018 09:00:09(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Hsquared14

Its taking a look at the website for Proctor Machinery Guarding.  They have boiled down all the requirements from the statndards into downloadable "ready reckoners" that you can slot your information into and get minimum guarding distances etc from.  You have to register which means you do get some information from them in your email inbox but I found that worth it for the access it gives you to their downloads.

CdC  
#6 Posted : 13 March 2018 11:18:19(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
CdC

Originally Posted by: Hsquared14 Go to Quoted Post

Its taking a look at the website for Proctor Machinery Guarding.  They have boiled down all the requirements from the statndards into downloadable "ready reckoners" that you can slot your information into and get minimum guarding distances etc from.  You have to register which means you do get some information from them in your email inbox but I found that worth it for the access it gives you to their downloads.

Thank you for your advice. Unfortunately the guides (Would be great if the link had been copied into the forum for easy retrieval) are not useful in my scenario. I am not worried about guarding to unsafe areas within the machine. I was speaking about access to maintenance hatches. Unless I have overlooked a specific ready reckoner/guidance that you have seen, I don't think this website helped me today.

CdC  
#7 Posted : 13 March 2018 11:36:26(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
CdC

I have asked the affected manager to go back into the operations manuals for the equipment and refer to the distances contained within. That's a good shout, which I hadn't thought about initially.

On the other hand I am looking at procuring a copy of PD5023:2014 but have a feeling it probably refers to guarding distance again.

Thank you for everybody's help again.

Ian Bell2  
#8 Posted : 13 March 2018 11:44:23(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ian Bell2

There are recommended spacing and layout distances for plant and machinery, tanks, reactors etc used in the oil/process industries. These use various HSE, specialist organisations documents. Many companies develop their own internal standards.

For general industrial machinery in factories - its usually down to risk assessment - using PUWER guidance, operational studies of the factory production processes/requirements and the available space that is available, fire safety requirements, moving/loading of materials around the factory.

I don't think you will find the complete answer in one source document.

CdC  
#9 Posted : 13 March 2018 12:04:06(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
CdC

Thank you Ian.

I don't think you will find the complete answer in one source document.

That's often the case in health and safety, isn't it?

I think we are on the right path now. 

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