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Dawson36394  
#1 Posted : 28 February 2019 09:58:09(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Dawson36394

Hi,  Just looking for some advice on what actions to take really.  Alot of our staff have individual offices which they like to make feel homely so they bring in settees, other comfy funiture or acquire it from other offices of people who have left.  Previously its been turned a blind eye to unless theres foam coming out of it but in reality should we only allow furniture like this that can be confirmed as fire retardant?  What do other people / organisations do? Thanks in a advance.

Elfin Davy 09  
#2 Posted : 28 February 2019 10:41:19(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Elfin Davy 09

Personally, I would only allow it if it could be confirmed as fire retardant (..if I allowed it at all !)

How does this sort of unchecked fire risk fit in with your fire risk assessment ?  Would it have any impact upon protected fire escape routes as a basic example ?

thanks 1 user thanked Elfin Davy 09 for this useful post.
Dawson36394 on 28/02/2019(UTC)
kmason83  
#3 Posted : 28 February 2019 11:20:21(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
kmason83

This would be an out and out no without any procduere for checking the fire resistance, the condition and getting them to agree to remove when they leave. Fire risk, hygiene risk, if its broken in any way that could cause harm who is picking up the tab on checking this, insurance would have fiel dday on that and then disposal who pays to get rid of it when its knackerd.
thanks 3 users thanked kmason83 for this useful post.
Dawson36394 on 28/02/2019(UTC), SJP on 05/03/2019(UTC), PH2 on 06/03/2019(UTC)
Dawson36394  
#4 Posted : 28 February 2019 11:26:15(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Dawson36394

Thankyou for the responses, it's much appreciated.  I'm being asked to ignore the matter but just don't feel comfortable doing that so looks like my christmas card list is going to reduce again!

Elfin Davy 09  
#5 Posted : 28 February 2019 11:31:12(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Elfin Davy 09

Join the club !  I stopped getting Christmas cards from my many admirers at work some years ago - it goes with the territory I'm afraid.  Some people just have no sense of humour !     :-)

A Kurdziel  
#6 Posted : 28 February 2019 11:41:56(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

This might be useful-

http://britishfurnitureconfederation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/BFC-Contract-flammability-guide.pdf
thanks 1 user thanked A Kurdziel for this useful post.
Dawson36394 on 28/02/2019(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#7 Posted : 28 February 2019 12:24:11(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Try a quick survey the other way round - look at all those nice DSE chairs your company issued and see how many of them (manufactured overseas) carry the labelling to prove fire resistance required for domestic supply.

I won't disagree that the item will add to the potential fire load but it will be the same regradless of being a bring your own or the company purchase.

Unless you have suruptitious smokers in a smoke free workplace what will cause the item to ignite?

Edited by user 28 February 2019 12:25:23(UTC)  | Reason: FFS

mike52  
#8 Posted : 04 March 2019 05:46:11(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
mike52

i wonder who is moving these items? if you are using other staff members are they doing it with management permission. if so then the company could e liable for a claim if the person moving the furniture gets injured. also why do they neeed sofas and such in their office? they are their to work not relax IMO. Mike
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SJP on 05/03/2019(UTC)
ttxela  
#9 Posted : 04 March 2019 08:23:25(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
ttxela

Originally Posted by: mike52 Go to Quoted Post
also why do they neeed sofas and such in their office? they are their to work not relax IMO. Mike

Trouble at t'mill?

Heve you not been to a fancy London office lately? No-one has desks any more, they recline on chaise longue's, perch at breakfast bars or 'breakout' in cosy nooks whilst connected to the cloud on their laptops and phones.

Dave5705  
#10 Posted : 04 March 2019 13:08:57(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Dave5705

Originally Posted by: ttxela Go to Quoted Post

Originally Posted by: mike52 Go to Quoted Post
also why do they neeed sofas and such in their office? they are their to work not relax IMO. Mike

Trouble at t'mill?

Heve you not been to a fancy London office lately? No-one has desks any more, they recline on chaise longue's, perch at breakfast bars or 'breakout' in cosy nooks whilst connected to the cloud on their laptops and phones.

and dont forget the x-box!
Dawson36394  
#11 Posted : 04 March 2019 13:59:34(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Dawson36394

Originally Posted by: ttxela Go to Quoted Post

Originally Posted by: mike52 Go to Quoted Post
also why do they neeed sofas and such in their office? they are their to work not relax IMO. Mike

Trouble at t'mill?

Heve you not been to a fancy London office lately? No-one has desks any more, they recline on chaise longue's, perch at breakfast bars or 'breakout' in cosy nooks whilst connected to the cloud on their laptops and phones.

There's no issue with them having a nice place to sit and work its more the fact that in some cases there is foam exposed and has been covered with a nice throw to conceal the damage or it came out of a house clearance.  As long as its in good condition and it can be demonstrated to meet the regs there's no bother.  

grim72  
#12 Posted : 06 March 2019 12:16:28(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
grim72

Have you had a read though this HSE Guide: Setaing at Work HSG57?  http://www.hse.gov.uk/pU...ed/hsg57.pdf  

Obviously it is focused on the usual adjustable office chairs but you might find a few things of relevance within it.

Just another couple of thoughts regarding bringing in chairs from home etc - hygiene could be an issue (especially if from a smokers home) and or the risk of any stowaways (fleas etc) being brought into the workplace?

thanks 1 user thanked grim72 for this useful post.
Dawson36394 on 08/03/2019(UTC)
Hsquared14  
#13 Posted : 07 March 2019 16:19:08(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Hsquared14

Originally Posted by: A Kurdziel Go to Quoted Post

This might be useful-

http://britishfurnitureconfederation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/BFC-Contract-flammability-guide.pdf

Just to back this up furniture in the workplace needs to be appropriate to the location.  I would agree that workplace these days to tend to have a mixture of formal and informal furniture and that is not necessarily a bad thing where welfare, reduction in institutional bullying etc is concerned, its a lot harder to bully someone if you are sitting on a sofa!  BUT it needs to be to the correct standard and should be from a reputable supplier of contract furniture.  

thanks 1 user thanked Hsquared14 for this useful post.
Dawson36394 on 08/03/2019(UTC)
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