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Bazzer  
#1 Posted : 12 June 2019 09:11:27(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Bazzer

I have a client who sprays multiple products onto wood. All are solvent based, and from the SDS have very similar health effects. Since the hazards, first aid and control measures are basically the same would it be acceptable to roll them all into one COSHH assessment (listing the products).

A couple of products are isocyanate based  so will have a separate COSHH assessment for these. Is it standard practice to wear air-fed RPE when using isocyanate based lacquers even when sprayed in a spray booth with LEV, or would a half mask with suitable filters be acceptable. I assume health surveillance is also required.

Benz3ne  
#2 Posted : 12 June 2019 10:01:59(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Benz3ne

Originally Posted by: Bazzer Go to Quoted Post

I have a client who sprays multiple products onto wood. All are solvent based, and from the SDS have very similar health effects. Since the hazards, first aid and control measures are basically the same would it be acceptable to roll them all into one COSHH assessment (listing the products).

A couple of products are isocyanate based  so will have a separate COSHH assessment for these. Is it standard practice to wear air-fed RPE when using isocyanate based lacquers even when sprayed in a spray booth with LEV, or would a half mask with suitable filters be acceptable. I assume health surveillance is also required.

If the practice is to use multiple chemical mixtures on wood, the COSHH should address the process rather than separate for individual components. However! If the components are used separately as well, there would need to be COSHH assessments for each process.

COSHH assessments are, after all, a risk assessment of the process and the controls of those substances which are hazardous. 

As for LEV vs filtration mask, you want to refer to ERICP (or whatever acronym is now used).

E = eliminate. Can you stop the process? Probably not.

R = reduce. Can you use less of the chemical? Can you use a less harmful chemical? Reduce the time of exposure? Potentially, but probably not.

I = isolate. Can this be done in an area where fewer people may be exposed? Quite possibly.

C = control. Can we control the exposure? YES engineering controls including LEV and/or spray booth fall firmly into this category.

P = PPE (or RPE). YES, we can issue masks, but LEV has come before this so should be explored further first.

Of course, this is going to be done so far as is reasonably practicable, and typically masks are cheaper but bear in mind you'll need your SSOW to address the use of LEV/RPE, your risk assessment/COSHH assessment to highlight the amount of exposure and, as you allude to, health surveillance for controlling something that should protect lung function. It's also worth bearing in mind you would need a thorough inspection every <14 months for the LEV, some flow monitor to prove it works when it should, and in the case of masks, correct fitting for the type of mask(s) used. 

Apologies if this comes across condescending in places; not my intention. Just thought it more worthwhile to spell it all out in case someone else visits with a similar query.

thanks 1 user thanked Benz3ne for this useful post.
Bazzer on 12/06/2019(UTC)
A Kurdziel  
#3 Posted : 12 June 2019 11:14:58(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

One process one assessment. Don’t worry about the numbers if you decide to use a risk matrix-life is too short. Think hard about the controls and apply the hierarchy of controls. Really think about things like elimination or substitution before you think about engineering controls (LEV). PPE should only be used if nothing else works. Make sure that the users know and understand the control: how they work and to use them correctly.   Make sure that the controls are properly maintained and that they work as they are supposed to every time.   

thanks 1 user thanked A Kurdziel for this useful post.
Bazzer on 12/06/2019(UTC)
chris.packham  
#4 Posted : 12 June 2019 11:34:16(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris.packham

You will certainly need  full air-fed hood type protection as a half mask would leave skin on the face and rest of the head exposed and the airborne exposure could easily result in skin exposure with consequent skin and systemic adverse health effects.  You will also need to consider the provision of hand and body protection. This might be complex to arrange as, for example, different solvents may require different types of glove, so although the process may be the same, the hazards could be very different and require different gloves.

You will certainly need health surveillance. With solvents and isocyanates this should include biological monitoring as this will be the only method that will identify total body uptake by all three routes of exposure. You will certainly need to consider lung function and skin condition assessment. 

If you need more on this PM me.

Chris

thanks 3 users thanked chris.packham for this useful post.
paul.skyrme on 12/06/2019(UTC), A Kurdziel on 12/06/2019(UTC), Bazzer on 12/06/2019(UTC)
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