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kmason83  
#1 Posted : 26 March 2020 10:12:31(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
kmason83

Hi everyone friends of mine who are nurses, pharmacy technicians, hospital staff all had face fit but asking me for tips on safe RPE removal, it's vital to get this right and I know you guys have a wealth of experience in this area so any tips I can pass on. My industry doesn't use much RPE so I would hate to miss anything vital. Thanks in advance
thanks 1 user thanked kmason83 for this useful post.
Kim Hedges on 28/03/2020(UTC)
RVThompson  
#2 Posted : 26 March 2020 11:15:42(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
RVThompson

thanks 2 users thanked RVThompson for this useful post.
Kim Hedges on 28/03/2020(UTC), Andy Cressy on 31/03/2020(UTC)
Kim Hedges  
#3 Posted : 29 March 2020 17:15:03(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kim Hedges

Is this just the paper mask you want guidance and suggestions or something more?

chris.packham  
#4 Posted : 30 March 2020 09:20:45(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris.packham

Safe removal of PPE doesn't just apply to masks. More than one study has shown that those wearing the single-use gloves that are found in healthcare, laboratories, etc., may on removing the gloves contaminate their hands with what is on the outside surface of the gloves. When providing practical glove removal training it is not unsual to find that even after having seen a demonstration of the correct removal technique over half will still contaminate their hands. In one study (Glove use among hairdressers: difficulties in the correct use of gloves among hairdressers and the effect of education, Oreskov KW, Søsted H, Johansen JD, Contact Dermatitis, 2015) 100% of those in the study contaminated their hands. Even after having been shown how to remove their gloves 58% still contaminated their hands. It is why hand decontamination after glove removal is so important.

thanks 1 user thanked chris.packham for this useful post.
Kim Hedges on 31/03/2020(UTC)
Kim Hedges  
#5 Posted : 31 March 2020 12:18:14(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kim Hedges

Nice comment Chris. 

I trained with the army previously, we had many exercises to train everyone in removing PPE containing a chemical agent, flimsy gloves do not help removal, but we found that having a 3rd dedicated person to assist in just the removal of PPE from the normal teams of 2 people worked out better, than allowing teams to simply try to remove it themselves. 

Kim Hedges  
#6 Posted : 31 March 2020 12:28:26(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kim Hedges

This 3rd person, needs to be in full PPE themselves and have access to some sharp scissors and a large spring top bin in close proximity, together with a misting spraygun, preferably on a 5 litre spray tank than a small spray bottle, as workers tend to get tied quickly and sometimmes develop hand cramps when tired. 

You may have already noticed, that wearing full PPE makes you tired quicker, so expect people to be frazzled, having the 3rd person cut off the PPE is often easier than struggling when tired.

bigpub  
#7 Posted : 31 March 2020 14:18:23(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
bigpub

In order to Don the PPE. Clean hands before doing anything:

1 Apron

2 Mask

3 Goggles

4.Gloves

Doffing equipment

1.Gloves

2.Apron

3.Goggles

4. Mask

All kit goes into a bag and tied. Wash hands at the end

shakey786  
#8 Posted : 31 March 2020 14:51:23(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
shakey786

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