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chris42  
#1 Posted : 18 May 2020 11:01:26(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris42

We are all getting people to wash hands with soapy water for 20 seconds min or a 65% alcohol hand gel. Door handles and the like are cleaned using disinfectant. But what about electronic equipment ie the photocopier, mobile phones, even car keys to a pool car. What are people doing with these items that may not take kindly to being soaped up or covered in disinfectant?

Some of our managers have reported using Anti-bacterial wipes from supermarkets. I know it is not a bacterium, but are these wipes capable of making the Virus that may be on these hard surfaces inert?

If not, what are others using to clean these things?

Advice appreciated

Edited by user 18 May 2020 11:02:49(UTC)  | Reason: fat fingers

chris.packham  
#2 Posted : 18 May 2020 11:14:23(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris.packham

The answer is to use alcohol wipes. We use these to sanitise probes used for skin condition measurements. 

Mark-W  
#3 Posted : 18 May 2020 11:18:19(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

In the last days before lockdown was instigated, 1 of my clients invested in lots of wipes and had a 2 hourly regime of wiping down door handles, photocopier control pad, etc etc. The office is on the first floor and with over 20 staff it seemed the most pragmatic approach.

Apart from the neat freak we have in the office, most would spend 10 mins wiping down the required surfaces, she decided it was a god escuse for a deep clean. It took several days to ensure she complied the same as the other office staff.

chris42  
#4 Posted : 18 May 2020 13:28:27(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris42

Thanks Chris and Mark

Mark; the wipes you refered to are they the alcohol ones that Chris noted ? or another sort ?

Most people have photocopiers and they tend to be touched by most. Ours is leased which I think a lot are, so we had best not damage it. 

It would be nice if it was something easily bought.

Chris

RVThompson  
#5 Posted : 18 May 2020 14:33:29(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
RVThompson

I've had a look on the internet and several sites refer to using a 70 % iospropyl solution applied to a microfibre cloth for general cleaning of sensitive kit such as touch screens.

We've placed hand sanitisers (again a 70 % alcohol gel) in offices, and discouraged sharing equipment wherever possible.

by the way, the alcohol gel appears to be kind to skin so far.

thanks 1 user thanked RVThompson for this useful post.
chris42 on 18/05/2020(UTC)
chris42  
#6 Posted : 18 May 2020 15:36:38(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris42

I remember as an engineering apprentice using Isopropyl alcohol to degrease component parts after test, ready for inspection. I remember if not careful you can end up floating around like the Bisto kids in the old advert. (other gravy is available, and best if you make your own). Can’t exactly drag the copier outside, but definitely worth a thought. I suspect if I allow that stuff in the workplace it will be used for everything under the sun -getting sticky labels off, getting the brown stains off the bottom of their mugs, the amount of misuse is unimaginable.

A little further research shows that some anti bac wipes are alcohol based and some may neutralise Viruses as well as kill bacterium. It should apparently say so on the packet if it does both. Additionally, Disinfectant needs to be on the surface for 5 minutes to be effective.

The skin issue for me was to stay in even more and so not need to wash hands so much. This allowed skin to recover a good bit and now not sensitive to the moisturiser.

Chris

Edited by user 18 May 2020 15:38:23(UTC)  | Reason: spelling

thanks 1 user thanked chris42 for this useful post.
RVThompson on 19/05/2020(UTC)
Holliday42333  
#7 Posted : 18 May 2020 16:11:12(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Holliday42333

Virtually every cleaning/anti-bac spray will have a detergent element that will break down fat.

It is the viruses outer fat layer that allows it to stick to surfaces.  So if you spray your surfaces with cleaning spray and then wipe down to remove the virus as its ability to stick to the surface is reduced (same principle as the hand washing advice).  Throw contaminated cloths/wipes away and segregate for 72hrs before disposing in normal waste streams.

Not a virologist (although I used to do product development of cleaning sprays) but that is how I have been interpreting the cleaning guidance.

thanks 2 users thanked Holliday42333 for this useful post.
chris42 on 18/05/2020(UTC), RVThompson on 19/05/2020(UTC)
chris.packham  
#8 Posted : 18 May 2020 20:35:27(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
chris.packham

“The study revealed that touching intact areas of moist skin transferred enough organisms to the nurses’ hands to allow subsequent transmission to catheter material despite handwashing with plain soap and water; by contrast, alcohol-based handrubbing was effective and prevented crosstransmission to the device.” – WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care, page 22

thanks 2 users thanked chris.packham for this useful post.
RVThompson on 19/05/2020(UTC), chris42 on 19/05/2020(UTC)
Kate  
#9 Posted : 19 May 2020 07:34:40(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kate

Isn't the outer part of the coronavirus particle protein rather than fat?

CptBeaky  
#10 Posted : 19 May 2020 08:18:54(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
CptBeaky

Originally Posted by: Kate Go to Quoted Post

Isn't the outer part of the coronavirus particle protein rather than fat?

https://www.newscientist.com/term/coronavirus/#ixzz6MsEKwNNK

"Coronavirus particles are surrounded by a fatty outer layer called an envelope and usually appear spherical, as seen under an electron microscope, with a crown or “corona” of club-shaped spikes on their surface."

As far as I know (and I am not a biologist) all enveloped viruses are surrounded by a fatty layer that protects the proteins inside. This is why these don't tend to survive digestion, alcohol etc. The non-enveloped viruses (such as noroviris) don't have this weakness. The are encased in a hard shell that can survive extreme PH levels and alcohol.

Obviously if someone knows better please correct me.

thanks 2 users thanked CptBeaky for this useful post.
Kate on 19/05/2020(UTC), chris42 on 19/05/2020(UTC)
RVThompson  
#11 Posted : 19 May 2020 08:47:24(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
RVThompson

From a brief literature search, it would seem that the spikes which project from the lipid (fatty) envelope are glycoprotein, and it is these spikes that attach to the host cells, and also give the virus it's name.

thanks 2 users thanked RVThompson for this useful post.
Kate on 19/05/2020(UTC), chris42 on 19/05/2020(UTC)
RVThompson  
#12 Posted : 19 May 2020 08:57:38(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
RVThompson

thanks 3 users thanked RVThompson for this useful post.
CptBeaky on 19/05/2020(UTC), Kate on 19/05/2020(UTC), chris42 on 19/05/2020(UTC)
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