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Svick1984  
#1 Posted : 08 September 2020 10:22:53(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Svick1984

Hi all, I hope everyone is well. I am wondering if anyone can help clarify if there is a definitive distance around fire exit doors that must be clear and the width of the escape route. We are having some new machinery put in and I'm trying to plan with our maintenance manager to ensure that the space we leave in front of the fire exit door and behind the machine - where there will be a walkyway - is not only adequate but within the legal requirements. It's a low risk area (little chance of fire, few flammable materials, use of water all around or within most of the areas, occupants are able-bodied etc) and likely only to be between 5-10 people using the area at any one time, with 2 other additional fire exit doors in the same area (maximum occupancy around 65-70 employees). I believe it to be a minimum of 750mm (unless used by less than 5 people or where there may be wheelchair users); is that correct? I am aware it can be calculated in a few different ways, but I just want to clarify what the minimum is. Are there any other things that need to be considered before determining this? Thanks.

Roundtuit  
#2 Posted : 08 September 2020 16:13:51(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Free internet download - Approved Document B2 table 2.3:

Up to 60 persons 750mm

Up to 110 persons 850mm

If your occupancy can be up to 70 then it would be 850mm for able bodied

D4 Width is measured according to the following. a. For a door (or doorway), the clear width when the door is open (Diagram D1). b. For an escape route, either of the following. i. When the route is defined by walls: the width at 1500mm above finished floor level. ii. Elsewhere: the minimum width of passage available between any fixed obstructions. c. For a stair, the clear width between the walls or balustrades. On escape routes and stairs, handrails and strings intruding into the width by a maximum of 100mm on each side may be ignored. Rails used for guiding a stair-lift may be ignored, but it should be possible to park the lift’s chair or carriage in a position that does not obstruct the stair or landing.

thanks 4 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Svick1984 on 09/09/2020(UTC), toe on 11/09/2020(UTC), Svick1984 on 09/09/2020(UTC), toe on 11/09/2020(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#3 Posted : 08 September 2020 16:13:51(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Free internet download - Approved Document B2 table 2.3:

Up to 60 persons 750mm

Up to 110 persons 850mm

If your occupancy can be up to 70 then it would be 850mm for able bodied

D4 Width is measured according to the following. a. For a door (or doorway), the clear width when the door is open (Diagram D1). b. For an escape route, either of the following. i. When the route is defined by walls: the width at 1500mm above finished floor level. ii. Elsewhere: the minimum width of passage available between any fixed obstructions. c. For a stair, the clear width between the walls or balustrades. On escape routes and stairs, handrails and strings intruding into the width by a maximum of 100mm on each side may be ignored. Rails used for guiding a stair-lift may be ignored, but it should be possible to park the lift’s chair or carriage in a position that does not obstruct the stair or landing.

thanks 4 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Svick1984 on 09/09/2020(UTC), toe on 11/09/2020(UTC), Svick1984 on 09/09/2020(UTC), toe on 11/09/2020(UTC)
Svick1984  
#4 Posted : 09 September 2020 09:10:31(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Svick1984

Originally Posted by: Roundtuit Go to Quoted Post

Free internet download - Approved Document B2 table 2.3:

Up to 60 persons 750mm

Up to 110 persons 850mm

If your occupancy can be up to 70 then it would be 850mm for able bodied

D4 Width is measured according to the following. a. For a door (or doorway), the clear width when the door is open (Diagram D1). b. For an escape route, either of the following. i. When the route is defined by walls: the width at 1500mm above finished floor level. ii. Elsewhere: the minimum width of passage available between any fixed obstructions. c. For a stair, the clear width between the walls or balustrades. On escape routes and stairs, handrails and strings intruding into the width by a maximum of 100mm on each side may be ignored. Rails used for guiding a stair-lift may be ignored, but it should be possible to park the lift’s chair or carriage in a position that does not obstruct the stair or landing.

Thanks for the reply Roundtuit. I'm a little confused now; can I assume the 850mm distance is the distance in-front of the fire exit door that must be clear? Does that apply even if all 70 plus people are unlikely to use the same fire exit door (given the size of the building and production is spread throughout)? Not sure I understand the "Elsewhere: the minimum width of passage available between any fixed obstructions"; please can you elaborate further? I assume if someone were to walk around the back of the machine where we have a wall adjacent, according to the above, there'd have to be a space of 1500mm from the wall to the beginning of the machine; is that the case? I don't think the space behind the machine is technically to be used for escape, it is there I believe primarily to access and service the machine, so if thats the case, even if the aforementioned 1500mm was correct, would it be discounted in this instance? Thanks for your help.

Svick1984  
#5 Posted : 09 September 2020 09:34:54(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Svick1984

Originally Posted by: Svick1984 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Roundtuit Go to Quoted Post

Free internet download - Approved Document B2 table 2.3:

Up to 60 persons 750mm

Up to 110 persons 850mm

If your occupancy can be up to 70 then it would be 850mm for able bodied

D4 Width is measured according to the following. a. For a door (or doorway), the clear width when the door is open (Diagram D1). b. For an escape route, either of the following. i. When the route is defined by walls: the width at 1500mm above finished floor level. ii. Elsewhere: the minimum width of passage available between any fixed obstructions. c. For a stair, the clear width between the walls or balustrades. On escape routes and stairs, handrails and strings intruding into the width by a maximum of 100mm on each side may be ignored. Rails used for guiding a stair-lift may be ignored, but it should be possible to park the lift’s chair or carriage in a position that does not obstruct the stair or landing.

I don't think the space behind the machine is technically to be used for escape, it is there I believe primarily to access and service the machine, so if thats the case, even if the aforementioned 1500mm was correct, would it be discounted in this instance? Thanks for your help.

Ignore the latter, I think it will now formulate part of the escape route.

Thanks.

Svick1984  
#6 Posted : 10 September 2020 08:02:03(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Svick1984

PS - Please could you provide the page number? I've looked within the Approved document and can't find the table you are referring to. However, I can see that HM fire safety RA for factories and warehouses provides slightly different amounts and sizes (page 70); please can you explain why? Just trying to understand the differing info. Thanks.

Svick1984  
#7 Posted : 11 September 2020 11:06:23(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Svick1984

Bump.

Roundtuit  
#8 Posted : 11 September 2020 11:22:52(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Approved Document B Volume 2 "Buildings other than dwellings"

Page numbered as 19 (but in a pdf reader shows as 29 of 204)

Edited by user 11 September 2020 11:23:54(UTC)  | Reason: hyperlink stretched the post

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Svick1984 on 17/09/2020(UTC), Svick1984 on 17/09/2020(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#9 Posted : 11 September 2020 11:22:52(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Approved Document B Volume 2 "Buildings other than dwellings"

Page numbered as 19 (but in a pdf reader shows as 29 of 204)

Edited by user 11 September 2020 11:23:54(UTC)  | Reason: hyperlink stretched the post

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Svick1984 on 17/09/2020(UTC), Svick1984 on 17/09/2020(UTC)
Svick1984  
#10 Posted : 17 September 2020 12:57:41(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Svick1984

Thanks again Roundtuit. I also wanted to ask, in terms of travel distance, in our case we have to have no more than 45m between fire exits (as we have more than one escape route and are a low to normal fire-risk) but, I wasn't sure if you can count a fire exit door whereby you have to go from one room to another. Basically, I'm trying to take some measurements from our shopfloor area at its furthest point (to see if we take a fire exit out, to accommodate a new machine being put in) to see if we break that 45m; in some cases we do. However, there are other fire exit doors close by, but to get to them, you have to go through other internal fire doors. Would they then be considered acceptable to fall within the 45m or does the rules change if you have to go through adjacent rooms to get to said fire exit doors? Sorry if this is confusing; I looked through the fire safety RA for factories and warehouses but couldn't seem to find a specific answer to that query. Thanks.

Svick1984  
#11 Posted : 21 September 2020 08:18:33(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Svick1984

Bump.

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