Welcome Guest! The IOSH forums are a free resource to both members and non-members. Login or register to use them

Postings made by forum users are personal opinions. IOSH is not responsible for the content or accuracy of any of the information contained in forum postings. Please carefully consider any advice you receive.

Notification

Icon
Error

Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Milkyken  
#1 Posted : 21 October 2020 08:16:04(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Milkyken

Hi

With all the recent change, CLC Rev 6 and new restrictions I was wondering how reactive works and also repairs/ remedial works now fall under tier 3 restrictions?

Can contractors enter homes in tier 3?

The gov website for working is clear but also says check locally for tiered restrictions.

Any help much appreciated
Kate  
#2 Posted : 21 October 2020 08:18:14(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kate

Milkyken  
#3 Posted : 21 October 2020 08:28:23(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Milkyken

Originally Posted by: Kate Go to Quoted Post


Thanks Kate

i know it says If you can’t work from home go to work but i know of contractors who have been stopped by the police entering areas that are high risk.

I’m guessing the controls if working in people’s homes stand as it is unless told differently.?
A Kurdziel  
#4 Posted : 21 October 2020 08:57:16(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

The purpose of the new rules is to stop the spread of the virus through socialising but it is not a proper lock down in that people are still allowed to go to work. So, if central heating breaks down or there is leak, I cannot imagine the government expecting old people to freeze. On the other hand, if what they are doing is something like painting and decorating then you could argue that this is not essential, and some people would try to stop you doing it. It all; depends on who is interpreting the rules. Some of the enforcement people seem to have taken into their heads that they are now experts on the spread of Covid 19: ” I know of contractors who have been stopped by the police entering areas that are high risk.”. How do the police know an area is high risk? Since when is that included in any police training?

I believe that as long as you enter properties for a good reason then you should be alright but no smiling or any other type of socialising and definitely no cups of tea!

 

Edited by user 21 October 2020 12:29:35(UTC)  | Reason: words and thgings

Milkyken  
#5 Posted : 21 October 2020 11:22:36(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Milkyken

Originally Posted by: A Kurdziel Go to Quoted Post
The purpose of the new rules is to stop the spread of the virus through socialising but it is not a proper lock down in that people are still allowed to go to work. So, if central heating breaks down or there is leak, I cannot imagine the government expecting old people to freeze. On the other hand, if what they are doing is something like painting and decorating then you could argue that this is not essential, and some people would try to stop you doing it. It all; depends on who is interpreting the rules. Some of the enforcement people seem to have taken into their heads that they are no experts on the spread of Covid 19: ” I know of contractors who have been stopped by the police entering areas that are high risk.”. How do the police know an area is high risk? Since when is that included in any police training?I believe that as long as you enter properties for a good reason then you should be alright but no smiling or any other type of socialising and definitely no cups of tea!


Thanks for this.

I’m just a little unsure how the line falls with essential works.

There is no guidance so I guess it’s same as before for working in people’s homes.
Brian Hagyard  
#6 Posted : 21 October 2020 11:27:36(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Brian Hagyard

As this situation continues the line beween law and guidance and between leagl and moral duty appears to become more and more blured!

Without saying if I agree with it or not i belive the current position in ENGLAND is that movement in or out of Tear 3 is not advised - some exceptions give for child care etc (although why you need exceptions for advice i am not clear) As such I dont belive the police can stop contractors from entering or leaveing Tier 3.

In WALES this is not the case - there they can enforce this none movement - they are even banning the English from Tire 3 from entering low risk welsh areas, although the police have already asked how on earth they can enforce this.

Sault23195  
#7 Posted : 28 October 2020 16:09:56(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Sault23195

Having worked in the Housing Sector for many years, social housing have a responsibility to ensure that their tenants are safe and the homes they provide for them are safe.  So if there is a gas leak and this is reported engineers will need to attend.  They have a duty of care to ensure that the Gas appliances are inspected, therefore again they have a duty of care to ensure that the tenant/occupier is safe.  The social housing organisation should ensure that they have trained their operatives to be COVID safe and ensure that they follow all protocols.  If this means wearing a face covering and asking the occupier to leave the room and spraying/wiping down with an antibac wipe to ensure the areas they touch are as sterile as possible so be it.  Nitrile gloves where possible and disposed of, but these could cause a hazard in their own right.   We have to apply a bit of logic to ensure that we are not leaving tenants in unsafe situations. 

thanks 1 user thanked Sault23195 for this useful post.
A Kurdziel on 28/10/2020(UTC)
peter gotch  
#8 Posted : 28 October 2020 16:36:22(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
peter gotch

I think that once again the debate is likely to be about what constitute "essential works".

Earlier in the year Westminster and Holyrood applied substantially different controls over what construction work might or might not take place.

So, as example, many Highways England projects remained on site whilst Transport Scotland ones shut up shop.

A softer line was taken on construction work at domestic properties.

Now clearly dealing with a gas leak is "essential". But what about planned refurbishment work - some might be simply cosmetic and might be argued to be far from "essential". But what about the replacement of windows in social housing that could have a major beneficial effect on the health of residents, particularly in the Winter months?

Roundtuit  
#9 Posted : 28 October 2020 19:56:34(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

"essential" a word divided by geography, gender, faith

Roundtuit  
#10 Posted : 28 October 2020 19:56:34(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

"essential" a word divided by geography, gender, faith

Users browsing this topic
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.