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Amogorji86  
#1 Posted : 05 April 2021 09:20:23(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Amogorji86

Hi all,

In my inspections of high rise construction projects, I am coming across this same issue over and over again.

When brick layers start facade work they are aletering/ dimantling scaffold protection in order to lay their brick work around the buildings facade. Toebaord, guards rails are being removed to get to the building wall, and we are ending up with leading edges everywhere.

Im hoping for a practicable and happy medium, that allows brickies access to walls but has resonable protection whilst they do their work.

Any suggestions?

Roundtuit  
#2 Posted : 05 April 2021 12:09:59(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Ask the designer how they intended the brickies access the task?

Roundtuit  
#3 Posted : 05 April 2021 12:09:59(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Ask the designer how they intended the brickies access the task?

peter gotch  
#4 Posted : 05 April 2021 12:32:00(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
peter gotch

Amogorji

This problem has existed since the first scaffolds were erected, so thousands of years ago!

It depends to some extent on what you call a leading edge, i.e. how big a gap between scaffold platform and the face of the building where the brickies are working.

When the law was more prescriptive and more proscriptive in the Construction (Working Places) Regulations 1966, it still recognised that there are times when precautions might need to be removed "for the time and to the extent necessary" to do the work.

As a rule of thumb, there should not be a gap of more than 300mm on the inner face of the scaffold through which a brickie (or someone else) could fall.

For various (legitimate) reasons, full scaffolds are usually erected with a gap between the inside and the face of the structure, but this can be protected as and when required, e.g. with the use of hop-ups on the inner face of the scaffold.

So, it's about making decisions as to who can alter the scaffold and when, and then putting it back into its original state when work requiring temporary changes that increase risk is completed. That of course also means making sure that whoever is in charge, usually the Principal Contractor is on top of getting each trade in at the right time.

P

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