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#1 Posted : 28 January 2009 20:21:00(UTC)
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Posted By Crim
Hi,

Just been on site where a joiner was using a nail gun, the type powered by a small gas cartridge.

Among the questions I asked was about the eye protection when I was introduced to a pair of plastic "glasses" that were issued when the joiner purchased the equipment.

The joiner assumed that because the glasses were included with the purchase they were the correct protection.

I have my doubts but was bemused by the number of different markings on the glasses.

In the early days of PPE Regs. it was grade 1 protection for such equipment not now as the classification has changed.

What is the required protection for use of nail guns and how is it marked on the PPE?

Further question -what is the training requirement for such equipment?

All responses appreciated.



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#2 Posted : 29 January 2009 09:28:00(UTC)
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Posted By David Matthew
My understanding is that it depends on how fast anything is likely to be coming at the wearer.

Without knowing the full facts my gut feeling is that safety glasses to EN 166 1F wouldn't be sufficient and would expect the tool user to have protection to be at least EN 166 1B.

Most large PPE suppliers give a breakdown of the various levels of eye protection in their catalogues.

Personally I think with the prevalance of mandatory light eye protection on many construction sites many people assume that the glasses will protect them from all hazards arising on site.

Without wishing to divert the thread what I also find is that a lot of builders merchants hold stocks of kit for sale that looks like PPE but isn't CE marked which people just pick up when they are at the trade counter thinking that its PPE.

Regards
David
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#3 Posted : 29 January 2009 09:42:00(UTC)
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Posted By Crim
Thanks David,

Can you, or anyone else inform me what should the user look for by way of markings on the ppe. Please remember this is a joiner on a construction site who is not necessarily up tospeed on h&s.

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#4 Posted : 29 January 2009 09:59:00(UTC)
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Posted By A Campbell
Crim,

I think you will find that the correct EC standard should be stamped on the frames...normally the side arm
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#5 Posted : 29 January 2009 12:56:00(UTC)
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Posted By Crim
Hi,

I know where to look for the marking but not what should be on the goggles for high impact.

Years ag oit was "grade 1" impact protection with the number 1 stamped on the lens.

Things have changed since then and I need to know what the standard mark is.




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#6 Posted : 29 January 2009 13:37:00(UTC)
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Posted By Adam Worth
http://www.greenham.com/...nguides/ppe/eyewear.html

I hope that helps

Failing that phone Sperian or Bolle. Both were very helpful when I had a problem (and i got free sunnies :) )
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#7 Posted : 29 January 2009 13:42:00(UTC)
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Posted By David Matthew
Bog standard goggles providing medium energy impact 120m/second will be marked EN 166 1B

Goggles for protection against specific hazards such as chemicals will have more numbers such as liquid droplets will have 3 as well.

Best bet is to get hold of a catalogue from say A**o which has a brief explanation of the various markings which can then be compared to the variety of eye wear they supply.

Hope this helps,
David
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#8 Posted : 29 January 2009 13:42:00(UTC)
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Posted By A Campbell
Thanks Adam,

Can't get a straighter answer than that!
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#9 Posted : 29 January 2009 14:05:00(UTC)
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Posted By John J
Crim,

class 1 for continuous use but in this case I'd be happy with a class 2 for intermittant work.

Unless you have a chronograph handy your not going to know the speed of your nail so its going to be a judgement call so I'd suggest a class B lens (120m/s - fast).

So your looking for something marked 1B or 2B. The frame will should be marked typacally EN166B which matches the B on the lens.

Where it is not the same you work to the lower rating,

John

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#10 Posted : 29 January 2009 16:32:00(UTC)
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Posted By mdg
for nail guns you should be looking for
BSEN 166 B or EN166 B "goggles or face shield"
as "safety glasses" will not provide the correct impact resistance
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#11 Posted : 29 January 2009 17:10:00(UTC)
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Posted By John J
Safety glasses may not give the same facial coverage but will give the same impact resistance if the frame and lens match.
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#12 Posted : 29 January 2009 17:12:00(UTC)
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Posted By Crim
Wow, what a response, and all good stuff.

Thanks a lot I'll get it sorted now.
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#13 Posted : 03 February 2009 16:53:00(UTC)
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Posted By paul@supremevisors.com
grade A is more like it for grinding wheels and hilti type guns - we are developing a product currently for this exact risk, as usual this is due to injuries when the wearer is using en166 approved lenses to grade B.
We manufacturer bomb disposal gear also so know a bit about these impacts

Paul
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