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Evans38004  
#1 Posted : 05 May 2022 07:29:45(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Evans38004

Is there any legal guidance on the number of loaded pallets that can be placed on top of each other? If so what documents specify the maximum level of stacking?

We have three main scenarios:

1. Wooden pallets with x4 metal barrels contining fluids - can these be stacked 3 high on level ground?

2. Wooden pallets with 7 layers of full aerosol cans - can these be stacked 3 high on level ground / on racking?

3. Wooden pallets with 7 layers of empty aerosol cans - can these be stacked 3 high on level ground / on racking?

Roundtuit  
#2 Posted : 05 May 2022 07:42:13(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Your pallets will need to be designed to suit a particular load and stacking based upon your assessment

HSE PM15 refers https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/pm15.pdf

The quality and dimesions of the material used (timber, chip block, pressed flake, plastic, steel) , the configuation (open, semi-open, closed boarding) the dimesions (load overhang/underhang and for racking the size tolerances) the load capacity (spread and point) will all impact if the pallet can support the load plus additional identical pallets placed on top.

Then you have to consider the shape of the supporting load - will additional pallets rock/distort the material they are placed upon. if pallet interleaves ar required to stop the layers spreading apart.

For smaller items e.g. aerosols you need to consider the loading arrangement i.e. column stack, interlocking brick stack

The SWL of the racking is a factor as is the inherent strength of the material being stacked upon.

Sorry it s not the Yes/No answer you were seeking but there are more considerations over and above a description of the items placed upon the pallet.

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Accidentia on 05/05/2022(UTC), Accidentia on 05/05/2022(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#3 Posted : 05 May 2022 07:42:13(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Your pallets will need to be designed to suit a particular load and stacking based upon your assessment

HSE PM15 refers https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/pm15.pdf

The quality and dimesions of the material used (timber, chip block, pressed flake, plastic, steel) , the configuation (open, semi-open, closed boarding) the dimesions (load overhang/underhang and for racking the size tolerances) the load capacity (spread and point) will all impact if the pallet can support the load plus additional identical pallets placed on top.

Then you have to consider the shape of the supporting load - will additional pallets rock/distort the material they are placed upon. if pallet interleaves ar required to stop the layers spreading apart.

For smaller items e.g. aerosols you need to consider the loading arrangement i.e. column stack, interlocking brick stack

The SWL of the racking is a factor as is the inherent strength of the material being stacked upon.

Sorry it s not the Yes/No answer you were seeking but there are more considerations over and above a description of the items placed upon the pallet.

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
Accidentia on 05/05/2022(UTC), Accidentia on 05/05/2022(UTC)
Accidentia  
#4 Posted : 05 May 2022 07:48:36(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Accidentia

I'm not aware of any legally set limits. It comes down to weight of the pallets and their loads. Also, is each loaded pallet structurally sound enough to take the weight of the one above it, i.e. shrink wrapped banded etc. The manufacturers/ suppliers normally give the weight of a pallet and the maximum number to stack. As regards racking, be guided by the maximum load allowed per bay which varies with the type of racking. If unsure check with the suppliers.
Evans38004  
#5 Posted : 05 May 2022 11:17:17(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Evans38004

Thanks both - 2nd query, what is an acceptable overhang of pallets on racking? 

I have one manager stating 4" another stating the max can be 6" - I'd like to be able to show these guys some documentation that confirms or rejects these measurements...

CptBeaky  
#6 Posted : 05 May 2022 11:28:35(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
CptBeaky

When I was trained on FLT (both counterbalance and VNA) I was taught that a pallet should overhang both at the front and back by around 7-10cm (3-4"), or very roughly the width of you 4 fingers. This allow the strongest part of the pallet to be supported by the beams.

I would worry that 6" my place the pallet corner blocks off the beams, and the weight would be taken soley on the bottom deckboards, which would be more prone to failure.

A quick google search suggest 3", although it would really depend on the design of your racking. For example some racking would not allow overhang whilst still having a pallet sit secure (normally when VNA trucks are used)

Roundtuit  
#7 Posted : 05 May 2022 13:45:54(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

There is a danger in presuming all pallets are of the same construction permitting generic rules.

If you have a very minimally constructed pallet (significantly open decked, few stringers and blocks) the overhang becomes unimportant if there is a significant load which will flex & potentially break the pallet or drop the load between the racking during lowering in to position.

Thanks to the Packaging Waste Regulations many pallets are re-used and often re-purposed without consideration if they are suitable for their new load or destination.

There is a "blue" hired pallet option which bucks these considerations for a price.

Roundtuit  
#8 Posted : 05 May 2022 13:45:54(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

There is a danger in presuming all pallets are of the same construction permitting generic rules.

If you have a very minimally constructed pallet (significantly open decked, few stringers and blocks) the overhang becomes unimportant if there is a significant load which will flex & potentially break the pallet or drop the load between the racking during lowering in to position.

Thanks to the Packaging Waste Regulations many pallets are re-used and often re-purposed without consideration if they are suitable for their new load or destination.

There is a "blue" hired pallet option which bucks these considerations for a price.

ajw  
#9 Posted : 05 May 2022 14:24:45(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
ajw

No set max/mins for this - you'll need to do a risk assessment within which you can add 'check' controls to make weeklly visual checks of pallet stacks , avoid close contcat with people etc. Have a look at https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/pm15.pdf  

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