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Herb  
#1 Posted : 08 June 2021 11:32:17(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Herb

Interested to know thoughts on fans in the workplace as it’s getting hotter and HSE guidance states a no if area is poorly ventilated. However, if area if ventilated and staff still want fans etc?
Roundtuit  
#2 Posted : 08 June 2021 11:40:09(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm

Sorry Herb you are going to have to provide the information where the HSE have said "No":

The law says employers must make sure there’s an adequate supply of fresh air (ventilation) in enclosed areas of the workplace. This has not changed during the pandemic.

You should be maximising the fresh air in a space and this can be done by:

natural ventilation which relies on passive air flow through windows, doors and air vents that can be fully or partially opened
mechanical ventilation using fans and ducts to bring in fresh air from outside, or  a combination of natural and mechanical ventilation, for example where mechanical ventilation relies on natural ventilation to maximise fresh air

Roundtuit  
#3 Posted : 08 June 2021 11:40:09(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm

Sorry Herb you are going to have to provide the information where the HSE have said "No":

The law says employers must make sure there’s an adequate supply of fresh air (ventilation) in enclosed areas of the workplace. This has not changed during the pandemic.

You should be maximising the fresh air in a space and this can be done by:

natural ventilation which relies on passive air flow through windows, doors and air vents that can be fully or partially opened
mechanical ventilation using fans and ducts to bring in fresh air from outside, or  a combination of natural and mechanical ventilation, for example where mechanical ventilation relies on natural ventilation to maximise fresh air

Herb  
#4 Posted : 08 June 2021 11:48:42(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Herb

https://www.hse.gov.uk/c...sssment-of-fresh-air.htm amd then under section 3 of the above it stated further down that 'Desk or ceiling fans should not be used in poorly ventilated areas.'

Dazzling Puddock  
#5 Posted : 08 June 2021 12:14:00(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Dazzling Puddock

You shouldn't have staff working in a poorly ventilated place in the first instance so my first thoughts would be to either increase ventilation or move the staff to a well ventilated spot rather than whether fans can be used in a poorly ventilated area.

thanks 1 user thanked Dazzling Puddock for this useful post.
rs10 on 08/06/2021(UTC)
peter gotch  
#6 Posted : 08 June 2021 12:35:54(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
peter gotch

However there is nothing wrong with supplementing adequate ventilation with local fans.

A Kurdziel  
#7 Posted : 08 June 2021 13:41:48(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

Fans do not provide ventilation; they simply move the air about and have a cooling effect on the skin. Ventilation refers to the supply of fresh clean air either naturally from a window or similar,  or by artificial means. If it is ventilated by artificial means the air supplied must be “clean” , that is means it can’t be the same old being recirculated through the room. It will be filtered and topped up with air from outside. Such a system must be maintained etc.

Adding to this the concerns with airborne microorganisms especially  Covid-19, means a fan is even less appropriate. See https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm

Herb  
#8 Posted : 08 June 2021 14:33:57(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
Herb

Just to confirm staff are working in offices with windows all open but still wanted fans.

Kate  
#9 Posted : 08 June 2021 14:54:55(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Kate

If the windows are all open it probably isn't poorly ventilated.

thanks 1 user thanked Kate for this useful post.
Dazzling Puddock on 08/06/2021(UTC)
Connor35037  
#10 Posted : 08 June 2021 14:58:30(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Connor35037

I've been asked this same question and my response was that fans could be used in well-ventilated rooms.
Originally Posted by: Herb Go to Quoted Post

Just to confirm staff are working in offices with windows all open but still wanted fans.



craigroberts76  
#11 Posted : 10 June 2021 08:52:06(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
craigroberts76

I wouldnt say offices are poorly ventilated, thats a personal opinion on whether the aim is humid or not.  personally as someone who has asthma, I can detect the humidity of a room immediately and it can cause a slightly more difficulties in breathing, however not to the point that it becomes dangerous to me.

If you were working in  a confinded space, such as a backup generator which are normally enclosed in brick and a meter all around it, then yes, this is poor airflow, therefore breathing aparatus is used.

biker1  
#12 Posted : 10 June 2021 11:48:54(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
biker1

Given the current concerns about transmission and spread of COVID, I would say that desk fans in an office are a definite no-no.

thanks 1 user thanked biker1 for this useful post.
farrell1 on 10/06/2021(UTC)
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