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tom279  
#1 Posted : 18 August 2021 07:18:26(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
tom279

Hi All, has anyone got any information on where it is acceptable to place an EV charging point. Does it need to be a set distance from a liquid fuel source ie oils/diesel etc. Ihave asked the manufacturer for info but they are not responding very quickly.

TIA

Gerry Knowles  
#2 Posted : 18 August 2021 07:48:11(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Gerry Knowles

We are currently working on the installation of anumber of EV charging points.  We have thought about where we should put them around the safest place and where they are most accessible.  So we have decided that we are going to put two of them in the front car park of the depot, this allows easy access for our own needs and that of our customers.  As we are a plant hire business we are also installing one in our loading bay, this is with the view to charging items of electrical plant.  The beauty of this is that they are not in close proximity of any fuel sources of our haz chem store.  

Messey  
#3 Posted : 18 August 2021 20:31:26(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
Messey

A useful EV fire safety guide document has been provided by Riscauthority - a group made up of insurance companies

Its not detailed, but is a great place to start when devsiing an EV FS Strategey - especially like my workplace, we are having 40 EV chargers in a basement car park - and more to follow

www.riscauthority.co.uk%2Fresource-download%2F401&usg=AOvVaw1G1inJy4_snaqg92hHkw_l">Recommendations for fire safety when charging electric vehicleshttps://www.riscauthority.co.uk › resource-downl...

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peter gotch on 19/08/2021(UTC)
nickgill  
#4 Posted : 19 August 2021 07:49:59(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
nickgill

EV charging points should be located outside of the DSEAR Hazard zone(s) relevant to the fuel storage areas on your site. You should check the DSEAR Risk Assessment and the accompanying plan showing the extent of these hazard zones. You may find more information on the APEA website... www.apea.org.uk 

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peter gotch on 19/08/2021(UTC)
paul.skyrme  
#5 Posted : 19 August 2021 12:28:39(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
paul.skyrme

Don’t forget that electrically installation of a vehicle charge point is not just a case of fixing it to the wall and connecting it to the nearest distribution board. It falls under special locations in BS7671 and your business insurer might require compliance with such as a condition of your insurance. The Office of Low Emission Vehicles has just done a second survey of the charging points that they have subsided and circa 80% did not comply with the requirements of BS7671 at the time of installation. You are also obligated to inform the Distribution Network Operator (not the company that you pay your electricity bill to) who owns and operates the public electricity network in your area.
thanks 2 users thanked paul.skyrme for this useful post.
Roundtuit on 19/08/2021(UTC), peter gotch on 19/08/2021(UTC)
Ian Bell2  
#6 Posted : 19 August 2021 13:55:14(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Ian Bell2

Unless you have a way of pressurising the diesel (with a risk of spray leaks), which is unlikely for normal open line refuelling of vehicles - then in the UK diesel for the purposes of DSEAR can be considered to be non hazardous, with no hazardous area zoning required.

For LPG propane tanks your hazardous area/separtion distance will depend on the size of the tanks. A separation distance of 3m is a good starting point - the information is on the HSE website.

Petrol - I'm assuming you aren't refualling with petrol? 

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peter gotch on 19/08/2021(UTC)
Mark-W  
#7 Posted : 28 September 2021 09:31:14(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

A bit unrelated but very similar. A client of mine has managers with Tesla's, MD has purchased 5 recently for all his managers. 

As they are a facilities company they fitted charge points at the homes of the managers. No cost incurred by employees. 

Where does the liability stop for employer? Company car, company installed charge there must surely be some liability going forward? Or is it absolved as soon as it's installed and sign off.

A Kurdziel  
#8 Posted : 28 September 2021 11:53:58(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
A Kurdziel

This is where company lawyers come in: who owns the charging set up? Has it been given to the employees so that once it has been supplied it is the responsible of its new owners. Their only come back if something goes wrong is if is down to poor installation. On the other hand if the employer continues to be responsible for it and in effect owns it then they remain liable (probably) it should all be written into the contract between the employer and employees…

If there is no such agreement and it is as clear as mud, then you can understand how lawyers can make so much money trying put in place retrospectively things  which should of have been built in from the start.  

Roundtuit  
#9 Posted : 28 September 2021 11:56:17(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Real grey area.

Our firm is offering Battery EV but the installation of any home charging point is down to the employee on the premis it is their property, their domestic electricity supply contract and their domestic insurance.

May be drifting in to unknown Benefit In Kind territory giving away a free charging installation as the kit and fitting are not cheap (but that is for the bean counters to worry about, been a while since I saw a copy of HMRC 480 Expenses and benefits - A tax guide).

Roundtuit  
#10 Posted : 28 September 2021 11:56:17(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Real grey area.

Our firm is offering Battery EV but the installation of any home charging point is down to the employee on the premis it is their property, their domestic electricity supply contract and their domestic insurance.

May be drifting in to unknown Benefit In Kind territory giving away a free charging installation as the kit and fitting are not cheap (but that is for the bean counters to worry about, been a while since I saw a copy of HMRC 480 Expenses and benefits - A tax guide).

Mark-W  
#11 Posted : 18 October 2021 11:32:08(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Mark-W

Thanks for the advice. As far as I'm aware there is no agreement. The managers were asked if they wanted a home charging point. Some took the offer and some refused.

There was no written agreement offered let alone signed to ensure a line in the sand so to speak of responsibilitys.

I'll speak to the operations director and see what he has to say about it all.

paul.skyrme  
#12 Posted : 18 October 2021 16:51:43(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
paul.skyrme

Originally Posted by: Mark-W Go to Quoted Post

Thanks for the advice. As far as I'm aware there is no agreement. The managers were asked if they wanted a home charging point. Some took the offer and some refused.

There was no written agreement offered let alone signed to ensure a line in the sand so to speak of responsibilitys.

I'll speak to the operations director and see what he has to say about it all.

The other thing is that you need to be sure that the installation has been done correctly, as work may be required on the installation prior to the charge point being fitted.

Plus the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) must be notified, this is very important, and you need to be sure that this has been done with the appropriate forms.  This is NOT the company that your employees pay their electricity bill to.

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Mark-W on 01/11/2021(UTC)
craigroberts76  
#13 Posted : 09 November 2021 12:17:46(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
craigroberts76

We have just had a free standing one fitted in the workshop / garage at work, I had no idea (being the H&S manager why would I be consulted ? :/ ) anyway I'm looking into pulling together a risk assessment for it, but I'm not happy that it wobbles a bit when pushed and if hit by a vehicle could easily expose the inside or short out. 

Why does the local energy provider need informing ? whats the reason, and is that something we have to do or the installer?

thanks

Roundtuit  
#14 Posted : 09 November 2021 12:37:01(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

If people keep adding load on the local mains eventually the sub-station circuit trips and everyone is without power - the distribution company need to ensure the local sub-station is capable of handling the load in the area.

It is down to the installer to inform the network operator of the load being applied not only as Amps but quantity e.g. 1 x 32A or 2x16A. This is especially important where multiple additional points are subsequently added.

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
craigroberts76 on 09/11/2021(UTC), craigroberts76 on 09/11/2021(UTC)
Roundtuit  
#15 Posted : 09 November 2021 12:37:01(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

If people keep adding load on the local mains eventually the sub-station circuit trips and everyone is without power - the distribution company need to ensure the local sub-station is capable of handling the load in the area.

It is down to the installer to inform the network operator of the load being applied not only as Amps but quantity e.g. 1 x 32A or 2x16A. This is especially important where multiple additional points are subsequently added.

thanks 2 users thanked Roundtuit for this useful post.
craigroberts76 on 09/11/2021(UTC), craigroberts76 on 09/11/2021(UTC)
Brian Hagyard  
#16 Posted : 09 November 2021 14:53:50(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Brian Hagyard

Had never come across a free standing charger so I googled it (always dangerous I know).  The only ones I can find appear to be aimed at the domestic market and connect to a standard distribution board.

They look to be little more than an “adaptor socket” so you can plug in an electric car charger. Very different to the commercial chargers fit outside shops etc – or am I missing the obvious?

craigroberts76  
#17 Posted : 09 November 2021 14:57:17(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
craigroberts76

looks like this - https://www.electrical2go.co.uk/project-ev-7kw-dual-outlet-floor-mounted-electric-vehicle-charger-with-rfid-functionality.html

it is bolted into the ground but wobbles.

Roundtuit  
#18 Posted : 09 November 2021 15:33:32(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Sounds more like a poor installation would suggest contacting the manufacturer for their opinion 

Roundtuit  
#19 Posted : 09 November 2021 15:33:32(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Roundtuit

Sounds more like a poor installation would suggest contacting the manufacturer for their opinion 

craigroberts76  
#20 Posted : 09 November 2021 15:44:34(UTC)
Rank: Forum user
craigroberts76

I've raised it and decomissioned the power until its resolved

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