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nidhishnbr  
#1 Posted : 13 June 2022 11:34:41(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
nidhishnbr

I have to commence lifting works in a limited space (Inside the shaft), the lifting is a continuous process and a limited workforce need to remain inside the shaft, we cannot remove the team from the shaft during each lift.

1. Is there any way to protect the crew from the failure of the suspended load

2. Any other cage system to protect the team, if any material falls from height.

Brian Hagyard  
#2 Posted : 13 June 2022 12:45:03(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Brian Hagyard

what is the load? You may be able to build a "refuge" to protect the people in the pit - but if something drops 30m (which is a fair old depth) it would have to be able to withstand the force - and if a liquid how do you prevent it splashing - also a whole host of emergency rescue questions. 

Sorry lots of questions before providing any ideas.

peter gotch  
#3 Posted : 13 June 2022 16:22:29(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
peter gotch

Hi nidhish - a fairly common risk e.g. in tunnelling - your profile says that you are in Qatar and plenty of tunnelling has been happening there!

So, it is about the lifting plan which should include for protecting those below.

If you go to the websites of the British Tunnelling Society or the International Tunnelling Association you should find links to relevant guidance but most will not be free to download.

Good luck, Peter

nidhishnbr  
#4 Posted : 13 June 2022 19:58:52(UTC)
Rank: New forum user
nidhishnbr

Originally Posted by: Brian Hagyard Go to Quoted Post

what is the load? You may be able to build a "refuge" to protect the people in the pit - but if something drops 30m (which is a fair old depth) it would have to be able to withstand the force - and if a liquid how do you prevent it splashing - also a whole host of emergency rescue questions. 

Sorry lots of questions before providing any ideas.

Thank you Brian, 

The load varies from 0.5T to 20T, and very less probability to fall directly onto the workforce as they are staying on the opposite end while lifting.

As you proposed refuge chambers as an option, do you have any guidance?

Note: We are not lifting any liquid items.

Well-trained lifting crew & As a part of the emergency procedure we have already limited the occupancy to 6 members at a time, with a standby secondary crane.

Brian Hagyard  
#5 Posted : 14 June 2022 09:10:07(UTC)
Rank: Super forum user
Brian Hagyard

As you proposed refuge chambers as an option, do you have any guidance?

Sorry no - not one i deal with on a regular basis - just took the problem back to 1st Risk assessment principles.

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