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#1 Posted : 02 August 2001 13:13:00(UTC)
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Posted By Andy Taylor
Can anyone tell me, is there a minimum and maximum noise level for fire alarm sirens/bells and how is this affected by the Noise at Work regulations? Do I need to complete a noise assessment?

We test our siren weekly and have received a complaint from an employee who's desk is very close to a siren.

Thanks in advance for any information which you can provide.

Regards,

Andy T.
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#2 Posted : 02 August 2001 14:11:00(UTC)
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Posted By Robert Woods
Do a noise assessment it will say that the person should be away from their desk when it is tested.
Problem solved.


Roibert Woods
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#3 Posted : 02 August 2001 15:52:00(UTC)
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Posted By Richard
Andy

This has come up with me. Our fire specialist colleagues will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the minimum is around 65 Db at a normal workspace.

I have had many colleagues complain about the noise, particular in bare stairwells, but even right under the loudest sounder a "down and dirty" noise assessment indicated no damage to hearing for at least 15 minutes.

Richard
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#4 Posted : 02 August 2001 15:53:00(UTC)
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Posted By Nigel Lusby
Andy,
The alarm level should be such that it can be heard, a level of 10dB above ambient noise levels is recommended (L64, safety signs and signals ACOP). Though it should not be "excessive or painful". The object here is more alarms that are lower as opposed to one big one that is heard perfectly 100 yards away at the end of the factory floor, but poleaxes the guy sat next to it.
Obligations under NAWR should be balanced with obligations to provide alarms. Dosage levels from an alarm test once a week are likely to be insignificant. You need to carryout an assessment where there is a risk of hearing damage, unlikely in the case of the alarm.
I can appreciate what Robert has suggested, and that asking someone to be away from their desk during an alarm is an attractive solution. However be aware this can become contagious, I would consider supplying ear plugs for the weekly test.

Regards Nigel.
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